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The piezoelectronic transistor: A nanoactuator-based post-CMOS digital switch with high speed and low power

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 November 2012

D.M. Newns
Affiliation:
IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center; dmnewns@watson.ibm.com
B.G. Elmegreen
Affiliation:
IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center; bge@us.ibm.com
X.-H. Liu
Affiliation:
IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center; xhliu@us.ibm.com
G.J. Martyna
Affiliation:
IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center; martyna@us.ibm.com
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Abstract

Moore’s law of transistor scaling, the exponential increase in the number of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistors per unit area, continues unabated; however, computer clock speeds have remained frozen since 2003. The development of a new digital switch, the piezoelectronic transistor (PET), is designed to circumvent the speed and power limitations of the CMOS transistor. The PET operates on a novel principle: an electrical input is transduced into an acoustic pulse by a piezoelectric element which, in turn, is used to drive a continuous insulator-to-metal transition in a piezoresistive element, thus switching on the device. Performance is enabled by the use of key high response materials, a relaxor piezoelectric, and a rare-earth chalcogenide piezoresistor. Theory and simulation predict, using bulk material properties, that PETs can operate at one-tenth the present voltage of CMOS technology and consuming 100 times less power while running at multi-GHz clock speeds. A program to fabricate prototype PET devices is under way.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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