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Biomimetic method for metallic nanostructured mesoscopic models fabrication

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 March 2013

Gennady V. Strukov*
Affiliation:
Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142432 Chernogolovka,
Galina K. Strukova
Affiliation:
Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142432 Chernogolovka,
*
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Abstract

Various metallic structures of complex shape, resembling natural objects such as plants, mushrooms, and seashells, were produced when growing nanowires by means of pulsed current electroplating in porous membranes. These structures occur as the result of nanowires self-assembling (biomimetics) if the electroplating is continued after the nanowires reach the membrane surface. By varying the membrane geometry and the pulsed current parameters, and alternating electroplating from two baths with different electrolytes, various models were fabricated, including a hollow container with wall thickness of 10-30 nm. The possibility of shape regulation for models was demonstrated: in certain conditions, mushroom- and shell-like convex-concave models of the same kind were obtained. The hierarchical structure of models at the nano-, micro- and mesoscopic levels is shown through fragmentation and chemical etching. This biomimetic method suggests an analogy between the shape-forming processes of natural plants and their metallic models. Nanostructured mesoscopic objects of metals (Ag, Pd, Rh, Ni, Bi), alloys (PdNi, PdCo, PbIn) as well as their combinations (PdNi/ Pb, PdNi/ PbIn) were obtained. The technological simplicity of the present method makes it suitable for fabricating nanostructured materials that may be efficient in catalysis, superhydrophobic applications, medical filters, and nanoplasmonics.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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References

REFERENCES

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Strukov, G.V., Strukova, G.K., Shoo, E.D., Bozhko, S.I., Kabanov, Yu.P.. ISSN 0020-4412, Instruments and Experimental Techniques 52(5) (2009) 727730; Original Russian Text published in Pribory i Tekhnika Eksperimenta 5(2009) 123–126.
Strukov, G.V., Stolyarov, V.S., Strukova, G.K., Zverev, V.N.. Physica C, 483,162164, 2012.CrossRef
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