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Nanostructurally Designed Ultra-hydrophilic Hard Ceramic Oxide Coatings for Orthopaedic Application

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 July 2013

Fereydoon Namavar*
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, UNMC, Omaha, NE Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
Renat F. Sabirianov
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
Jiaming Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences and Materials Science & Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Chin Li Cheung
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Lincoln, NE Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
Charles Blatchley
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS
Raheleh Miralami
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, UNMC, Omaha, NE
John G. Sharp
Affiliation:
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology & Anatomy, UNMC, Omaha, NE
Kevin L. Garvin
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, UNMC, Omaha, NE
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Abstract

This paper addresses the application of engineered nanocrystalline ultrahydrophilic titanium oxide films to artificial orthopaedic implants. Titanium (Ti) is the material of choice for orthopaedic applications and has been used for over fifty years because of its known bio-compatibility. Recently it was shown that biocompatibility of Ti metal is due to the presence of a thin native sub-stoichiometric titanium oxide layer [1] which enhances the adsorption of mediating proteins on the surface thus enhancing cell adhesion and growth [2,3,4]. Improving the quality of surface oxide, i.e. fabricating stoichiometric oxides as well as nanoengineering the surface topology that matches the dimensions of adhesive proteins, is crucial for the increase of protein adsorption [2] and, as a result, the biocompatibility of Ti implant materials. We have fabricated ultrahydrophilic nano-crystalline transparent films of anatase phase of titania (TiO2) by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) processes in an ultrahigh vacuum system. Source material was 99.9% pure rutile TiO2. Various ion beam conditions were used to produce these coatings with different grain sizes (4 to 70 nm) that affect the wettability, roughness, and the mechanical and optical properties of the coating [5]. Our biological experiments have shown that biocompatibility of these ultrahydrophilic nanoengineered TiO2 coatings are superior to commonly used orthopaedic titanium and even hydroxyapatite.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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References

REFERENCES

Namavar, F., et al. ., Why is Titanium biocompatible? Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, (2012).Google Scholar
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Nanostructurally Designed Ultra-hydrophilic Hard Ceramic Oxide Coatings for Orthopaedic Application
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