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Physical Metallurgy and Properties of β-solidifying TiAl Based Alloys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 January 2011

Helmut Clemens
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, A-8700, Leoben, Austria
Thomas Schmoelzer
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, A-8700, Leoben, Austria
Martin Schloffer
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, A-8700, Leoben, Austria
Emanuel Schwaighofer
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, A-8700, Leoben, Austria
Svea Mayer
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, A-8700, Leoben, Austria
Gerhard Dehm
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben, A-8700, Leoben, Austria
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Abstract

In this paper, the physical metallurgy and properties of a novel family of high-strength γ-TiAl-based alloys is reviewed succinctly. These so-called TNM™ alloys contain Nb and Mo additions in the range of 3 - 7 atomic percent as well as small additions of B and C. For the definition of the alloy composition thermodynamic calculations using the CALPHAD method were conducted. The predicted phase transformation and ordering temperatures were verified by differential scanning calorimetry and in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction. TNM alloys solidify via the β-phase and exhibit an adjustable β-phase volume fraction at temperatures, where hot-working processes are performed. Due to the high volume fraction of β-phase these alloys can be processed isothermally as well as under near conventional conditions. In order to study the occurring deformation and recrystallization processes during hot-working, in situ diffraction experiments were conducted during compression tests at elevated temperatures. With subsequent heat-treatments a significant reduction of the β-phase is achieved. These outstanding features of TNM alloys distinguish them from other TiAl alloys which must exclusively be processed under isothermal conditions and/or which always exhibit a high fraction of β-phase at service temperature. After hot-working and multi-step heat-treatments, these alloys show yield strength levels > 800 MPa at room temperature and also good creep resistance at elevated temperatures.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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