Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-9wdfl Total loading time: 0.239 Render date: 2022-01-23T01:09:55.207Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

“To whom honor is due”: Mediated crime-scenes and minority stigmatization in a border-crossing context

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 July 2015

Kira Kosnick*
Affiliation:
Institute for Sociology, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Gräfstr. 78, D-60486, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, kosnick@em.uni-frankfurt.de

Abstract

This article focuses on a scandal surrounding the airing of an episode of Germany's most famous TV crime series, in which there occurred a murder in an Alevi immigrant family originally attributed to a Sunni Muslim who had just arrived from Turkey. The Alevi father and head of the family was then found out to have murdered his own daughter after she had threatened to reveal that he was sexually abusing her sister. The episode was met with an enormous outcry from Alevis based in Germany as well as in Turkey. This essay analyzes the protests for what they reveal about the trans-nationalization of stereotypes and immigrant demands for fair media representation in Germany. It is argued that it marks a new stage in the development of border-crossing public spheres in which the politics of cultural struggle in relation to ethnic and religious hierarchies lose some of their national moorings.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © New Perspectives on Turkey 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Basch, Linda C, Nina, Glick-Schiller, and Cristina, Szanton-Blanc. Nations Unbound: Transnational Projects, Postcolonial Predicaments, and Deterritorialized Nation-States. Langhorne, PA: Gordon and Breach, 1994.Google Scholar
Baumann, Gerd. “Nation, Ethnicity and Community.” In Diasporas: Concepts, Intersections, Identities, edited by Kim, Knott and Seán, McLoughlin, 4549. London: Zed Books, 2010.Google Scholar
Berger, Hartwig. “Vom Klassenkampfzum Kulturkonflikt: Wandlungen und WendungenderWestdeutschen Migrationsforschung.” In Ethnizitdt: Wissenschafi und Minderheiten, edited by Dittrich, E. and Radtke, O., 119138. Opladen: Westdeutscher Verlag, 1990.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bunzl, Matti. “Between Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia: Some Thoughts on the New Europe.American Ethnologist 32, no. 4 (2005): 499508.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clifford, James. “Diasporas.” Cultural Anthropology 9, no. 3 (1994): 302338.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Çaglar, Ayse. “Das Kultur-Konzept als Zwangsjacke in Studien zur Arbeitsmigration.Zeitschrifi fir Ttirkeistudien, no. 1 (1990): 93105.Google Scholar
Cilroy, Paul. The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Click-Schiller, Nina, Linda, G. Basch, and Cristina, Blanc-Szanton, eds. Towards a Transnational Perspective on Migration: Race, Class, Ethnicity, and Nationalism Reconsidered. New York: New York Academy of Sciences, 1992.Google Scholar
Kearney, Michael. “The Local and the Global: The Anthropology of Globalization and Transnationalism.Annual Review of Anthropology 24 (1995): 547565.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kelek, Necia. “Aleviten-Protest gegen “Tatort”-Krimi: Die falsche Spur.” TAZ, January 21, 2008, http://www.taz.de/!11241/.Google Scholar
Kosnick, Kira. Migrant Media: Turkish Broadcasting and Multicultural Politics in Berlin. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kosnick, Kira. ‘“Speaking in One’s Own Voice’: Representational Strategies of Alevi Turkish Migrants on Open-Access Television in Berlin.” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 30, no. 5 (2004): 979994.Google Scholar
Koln Mitingine 50 bin Kisi Katildi!” Radio Yaylacik FM, http://www.yaylacik.com/modules.php?name=News&file=print&sid=1341.Google Scholar
Kûçükcan, Talip. “State, Islam, and Religious Liberty in Modern Turkey: Reconfiguration of Religion in the Public Sphere.Brigham Young University Law Review 2003, no. 2 (2003): 475506.Google Scholar
Malkki, Liisa. “National Geographic: The Rooting of Peoples and the Territorialization of National Identity among Scholars and Refugees.Cultural Anthropology 7, no. 1 (1992): 2444.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mandel, Ruth. “Ethnicity and Identity among Migrant Guestworkers in West Berlin.” In Confici, Migration, and the Expression of Ethnicity, edited by Gonzales, N. and McCommon, C., 6074. Boulder: Westview Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Østergaard-Nielsen, Eva. Transnational Politics: Turks and Kurds in Germany. London: Routledge, 2003.Google Scholar
Ogelman, Nedim. “Documenting and Explaining the Persistence of Homeland Politics Among Germany’s Turks.International Migration Review 37, no. 1 (2003): 163193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pries, Ludger. Die Transnationalisierung der sozialen Welt. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 2008.Google Scholar
Sarrazin, Thilo. Deutschland schafft sich ab. Munich: Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt, 2010.Google Scholar
Sökefeld, Martin. “Einleitung: Aleviten in Deutschland: Von Takiye zur alevitischen Bewegung.” In Aleviten in Deutschland: Identitatsprozesse einer Religionsgemeinschafi in der Diaspora, edited by Martin, Sökefeld, 736. Bielefeld: transcript Verlag, 2008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

“To whom honor is due”: Mediated crime-scenes and minority stigmatization in a border-crossing context
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

“To whom honor is due”: Mediated crime-scenes and minority stigmatization in a border-crossing context
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

“To whom honor is due”: Mediated crime-scenes and minority stigmatization in a border-crossing context
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *