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Translocation of problem Amur tigers Panthera tigris altaica to alleviate tiger-human conflicts

  • John M. Goodrich (a1) and Dale G. Miquelle (a1)
Abstract

We translocated four Amur tigers Panthera tigris altaica captured after killing domestic animals or attacking people; two were released immediately and two following 162 and 388 days rehabilitation. All were radio-collared and released 150–350 km from their capture site. Two translocations were successful: the tigers caused no conflicts with people, killed wild prey, and survived their first winter, although one was poached after 1.1 year and one slipped its collar after surviving 10 months. In the two translocations that were unsuccessful, both tigers moved to areas of high human activity and were killed by people. At least in some cases, translocation appears to be a viable alternative to killing or removing problem tigers from the wild.

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      Translocation of problem Amur tigers Panthera tigris altaica to alleviate tiger-human conflicts
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We translocated four Amur tigers Panthera tigris altaica captured after killing domestic animals or attacking people; two were released immediately and two following 162 and 388 days rehabilitation. All were radio-collared and released 150–350 km from their capture site. Two translocations were successful: the tigers caused no conflicts with people, killed wild prey, and survived their first winter, although one was poached after 1.1 year and one slipped its collar after surviving 10 months. In the two translocations that were unsuccessful, both tigers moved to areas of high human activity and were killed by people. At least in some cases, translocation appears to be a viable alternative to killing or removing problem tigers from the wild.

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Corresponding author
Correspondence: Hornocker Wildlife Institute, Wildlife Conservation Society, 2023 Stadium Drive, Suite 1a, Bozeman, Montana, USA. Email tiger372@yahoo.com
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Oryx
  • ISSN: 0030-6053
  • EISSN: 1365-3008
  • URL: /core/journals/oryx
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