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Human–wildlife conflict in Mozambique: a national perspective, with emphasis on wildlife attacks on humans

  • Kevin M. Dunham (a1), Andrea Ghiurghi (a2), Rezia Cumbi (a3) and Ferdinando Urbano (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S003060530999086X
  • Published online: 06 April 2010
Abstract
Abstract

Human–wildlife conflicts are common across Africa. In Mozambique, official records show that wildlife killed 265 people during 27 months (July 2006 to September 2008). Crocodile Crocodylus niloticus, lion Panthera leo, elephant Loxodonta africana and hippopotamus Hippopotamus amphibius caused most deaths but crocodiles were responsible for 66%. Crocodile attacks occurred across Mozambique but 53% of deaths occurred in districts bordering Lake Cabora Bassa and the Zambezi River. Hippopotamus attacks were also concentrated here. Lion attacks occurred mainly in northern Mozambique and, while people were attacked by elephants across the country, 67% of deaths occurred in northern Mozambique. Attacks by lions, elephants or hippopotamuses were relatively rare but additional data will probably show that attacks by these species are more widespread than the preliminary records suggest. Buffalo Syncerus caffer, hyaena Crocuta crocuta and leopard Panthera pardus were minor conflict species. Good land-use planning, a long-term solution to many conflicts, is particularly relevant in Mozambique, where the crocodile and hippopotamus populations of protected areas are often in rivers that border these areas, and cause conflicts outside them, and where people commonly live within protected areas. Poverty may prompt fishermen to risk crocodile attack by entering rivers or lakes. The high incidence of conflicts near Limpopo and South Africa’s Kruger National Parks (both within the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area) highlights the problems created for people by facilitating the unrestricted movement of wildlife between protected areas across their land.

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*P.O. Box CH385, Chisipite, Harare, Zimbabwe. E-mail faykevin@zol.co.zw
Linked references
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

P.I. Chiyo , P.E. Cochrane , L. Naughton & G.I. Basuta (2005) Temporal patterns of crop raiding by elephants: a response to changes in forage quality or crop availability? African Journal of Ecology, 43, 4855.

P.S. Corbet (1960) The food of a sample of crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus L.) from Lake Victoria. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 133, 561571.

R.E. Hoare (2000) African elephants and humans in conflict: the outlook for coexistence. Oryx, 34, 3438.

R.E. Hoare & J.T. Du Toit (1999) Coexistence between people and elephants in African savannas. Conservation Biology, 13, 633639.


C.E. O’Connell-Rodwell , T. Rodwell , M. Rice & L.A. Hart (2000) Living with the modern conservation paradigm: can agricultural communities co-exist with elephants? A five-year case study in East Caprivi, Namibia. Biological Conservation, 93, 381391.

M.O. Ogada , R. Woodroffe , N.O. Oguge & L.G. Frank (2003) Limiting depredation by African carnivores: the role of livestock husbandry. Conservation Biology, 17, 15211530.

F.V. Osborn (2004) Seasonal variation of feeding patterns and food selection by crop-raiding elephants in Zimbabwe. African Journal of Ecology, 42, 322327.

C. Packer , D. Ikanda , B. Kissul & H. Kushnir (2005) Lion attacks on humans in Tanzania. Nature, 436, 927928.

N.W. Sitati & M.J. Walpole (2006) Assessing farm-based measures for mitigating human–elephant conflict in Transmara District, Kenya. Oryx, 40, 279286.

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Oryx
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  • EISSN: 1365-3008
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