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Family members' views on the benefits of harp music vigils for terminally-ill or dying loved ones

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 October 2013

Linda Ganzini*
Affiliation:
Health Services Research & Development, Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR
Alexa Rakoski
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN
Sharilyn Cohn
Affiliation:
SacredFlight, Portland OR
Richard A. Mularski
Affiliation:
Kaiser Permanente, Portland, OR
*
Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Linda Ganzini, R&D 66, Portland VAMC, PO Box 1034, Portland, OR 97207; 503-220-8262. E-mail: Linda.Ganzini@va.gov

Abstract

Objectives:

Music-thanatology is a palliative modality that uses harp and voice to provide bedside vigils, particularly for terminally ill or actively dying. We sought to determine the benefits of music vigils for terminally ill patients.

Methods:

Survey of 55 family members, whose terminally ill loved one experienced a music vigil during hospitalization, regarding effects on the patient's breathing, relaxation, comfort, pain and ability to sleep. Written comments on negative and positive results of the vigils were coded using content analysis.

Results:

Family members perceived that the vigils resulted in modest improvement in the patients' breathing, relaxation, comfort, and ability to sleep, with fewer positive effects on pain, and almost no negative effects. Open ended comments focused on the positive benefit in increasing calm, relaxation, comfort. Comments on the positive effects for the family were almost as common as comments on the positive results for the patient.

Significance of Results:

The use of music-vigils in palliative care should be investigated more extensively as our study supports that this intervention has benefits, almost no risk, minimal cost, and may improve patient-family experience of the dying process.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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References

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