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Distribution of Eurasian otter biliary parasites, Pseudamphistomum truncatum and Metorchis albidus (Family Opisthorchiidae), in England and Wales

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2009

E. SHERRARD-SMITH*
Affiliation:
School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK
J. CABLE
Affiliation:
School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK
E. A. CHADWICK
Affiliation:
School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK
*
*Corresponding author: School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK. Tel: +44(0)29 20874046. Fax: +44 (0)29 20874116. E-mail: sherrardsmithE@cardiff.ac.uk

Summary

Gall bladders from 273 otter carcasses, collected throughout England and Wales, were screened to assess the status of gall bladder parasites in the Eurasian otter, Lutra lutra. The digenean Pseudamphistomum truncatum had previously been found in UK otters collected between 2000 and 2007. The parasite was established in Somerset and Dorset but its distribution elsewhere in the UK was largely unknown. In the current study, P. truncatum was also found to be abundant in south Wales, with occasional cases elsewhere, but appears to be absent from the north of England. Overall, 11·7% of otters were infected with 1–238 P. truncatum. A second digenean, Metorchis albidus, previously unreported in British otters, was found in the biliary system of 6·6% of otters. M. albidus appears well established in Suffolk, Norfolk and north Essex but was recorded elsewhere rarely. Both parasites are associated with pathological damage to the otter gall bladder. The recent discovery of these two non-native parasites provides a unique opportunity to assess their impact on native British fauna.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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Distribution of Eurasian otter biliary parasites, Pseudamphistomum truncatum and Metorchis albidus (Family Opisthorchiidae), in England and Wales
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