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Post-surgical follow-up (by ELISA and immunoblotting) of cured versus non-cured cystic echinococcosis in young patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 September 2007

N. BEN NOUIR
Affiliation:
University of Monastir, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Clinical Biology B, Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, 99UR/08-05 1– rue Avicenne, 5000 MonastirTunisia
S. NUÑEZ
Affiliation:
Institute of Parasitology, University of Bern, Längass-Strasse 122, CH-3001 Bern, Switzerland
E. FREI
Affiliation:
Institute of Parasitology, University of Bern, Längass-Strasse 122, CH-3001 Bern, Switzerland
M. GORCII
Affiliation:
University of Monastir, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Clinical Biology B, Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, 99UR/08-05 1– rue Avicenne, 5000 MonastirTunisia
N. MÜLLER
Affiliation:
Institute of Parasitology, University of Bern, Längass-Strasse 122, CH-3001 Bern, Switzerland
C. GIANINAZZI
Affiliation:
Institute of Parasitology, University of Bern, Längass-Strasse 122, CH-3001 Bern, Switzerland
M. MEKKI
Affiliation:
E. P. S. Fattouma Bourguiba, Pediatric Surgery Service, Monastir 5000, Tunisia
A. NOURI
Affiliation:
E. P. S. Fattouma Bourguiba, Pediatric Surgery Service, Monastir 5000, Tunisia
H. BABBA
Affiliation:
University of Monastir, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Clinical Biology B, Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, 99UR/08-05 1– rue Avicenne, 5000 MonastirTunisia
B. GOTTSTEIN*
Affiliation:
Institute of Parasitology, University of Bern, Längass-Strasse 122, CH-3001 Bern, Switzerland
*
*Corresponding author: Institute of Parasitology, University of Bern, Längass-Strasse 122, CH-3001, Bern, Switzerland. Tel: +41 31 631 24 18. Fax: +41 31 631 24 77. E-mail: bruno.gottstein@ipa.unibe.ch

Summary

The study was designed to determine comparatively the prognostic value of immunoblotting and ELISA in the serological follow-up of young cystic echinococcosis (CE) patients exhibiting either a cured or a progredient (non-cured) course of disease after treatment. A total of 54 patients (mean age 9 years, range from 3 to 15 years) with surgically, radiologically and/or histologically proven CE were studied for a period up to 60 months after surgery. Additionally, some of the patients underwent chemotherapy. Based on the clinical course and outcome, as well as on imaging findings, patients were clustered into 2 groups of either cured (CCE), or non-cured (NCCE) CE patients. ELISA showed a high rate of seropositivity 4 to 5 years post-surgery for both CCE (57·1%) and NCCE (100%) patients, the difference found between the two groups was statistically not significant. Immunoblotting based upon recognition of AgB subcomponents (8 and 16 kDa bands) showed a decrease of respective antibody reactivities after 4 years post-surgery. Only sera from 14·3% of CCE patients recognized the subcomponents of AgB after 4 years, while none (0%) of these sera was still reactive at 5 years post-surgery. At variance, immunoblotting remained positive for AgB subcomponents in 100% of the NCCE cases as tested between 4 and 5 years after surgical treatment. Immunoblotting therefore proved to be a useful approach for monitoring post-surgical follow-ups of human CCE and NCCE in young patients when based upon the recognition of AgB subcomponents.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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References

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Post-surgical follow-up (by ELISA and immunoblotting) of cured versus non-cured cystic echinococcosis in young patients
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