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Democracy and Education Behind Bars

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 September 2015

Abstract

In this Praxis Reflection, I reflect on the relationship between teaching and imprisonment. I describe a college program at a prison in Jessup, Maryland, and argue that liberal arts-style college classes should be widely available in prisons even as we work to dismantle the current system of mass incarceration.

Type
Reflections
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2015 

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