Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Why Does Political Science Hate American Indians?

Abstract

Native Americans have been structurally excluded from the discipline of political science in the continental United States, as has Native epistemology and political issues. I analyze the reasons for these erasures and elisions, noting the combined effects of rejecting Native scholars, political issues, analysis, and texts. I describe how these arise from presumptions inherent to the disciplinary practices of U.S. political science, and suggest a set of alternative formulations that could expand our understanding of politics, including attention to other forms of law, constitutions, relationships to the environment, sovereignty, collective decision-making, U.S. history, and majoritarianism.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Why Does Political Science Hate American Indians?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Why Does Political Science Hate American Indians?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Why Does Political Science Hate American Indians?
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
References
Hide All
AlfredGerald Taiaiake. 2005. Wasáse: Indigenous Pathways of Action and Freedom. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
American Political Science Association, Committee on Standards of Instruction. 1962. “Political Science as a Discipline.” American Political Science Review 56(2): 417–21.
BarkerJoanne. 2011. Native Acts: Law, Recognition, and Cultural Authenticity. Durham: Duke University Press.
BonninGertrude (Zitkala-Sa). 1924. Oklahoma’s Poor Rich Indians: An Orgy of Graft and Exploitation of the Five Civilized Tribes, Legalized Robbery. Philadelphia: Office of the Indian Rights Association.
BrooksLisa. 2011. “The Constitution of the White Earth Nation: A New Innovation in a Longstanding Indigenous Literary Tradition.” Studies in American Indian Literatures 23(4): 4876.
BruyneelKevin. 2007. The Third Space of Sovereignty: The Postcolonial Politics of U.S.–Indigenous Relations. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
ByrdJodi. 2011. The Transit of Empire: Indigenous Critiques of Colonialism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
ChakrabartyDipesh. 2000. Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
CoulthardGlen. 2014. Red Skin, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
DeloriaVineJr. 1969. Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.
DeloriaVineJr. and WilkinsDavid E.. 1999. “Racial and Ethnic Studies, Political Science, and Midwifery.” Wicazo Sa Review 14(2): 70.
DeloriaVineJr. and WilkinsDavid E.. 2000. Tribes, Treaties, and Constitutional Tribulations. Austin: University of Texas Press.
EastmanCharles. 1911. The Soul of the Indian: An Interpretation. New York: Houghton.
FergusonKennan. 2014. “The Deep Biology of Politics: A Reminder.” Political Research Quarterly 67(2): 457–61.
GibbonsMichael T., CooleDiana, EllisElisabeth, and FergusonKennan, eds. 2014. The Encyclopedia of Political Thought, 8 vols. New York: Wiley Blackwell.
GoldsteinAlyosha. 2014. Formations of United States Colonialism. Durham: Duke University Press.
GrindeDonald A.Jr. and JohansenBruce E.. 1991. Exemplar of Liberty: Native America and the Evolution of Democracy. Native American Studies Series. Los Angeles: UCLA.
JencoLeigh. 2015. Changing Referents: Learning Across Space and Time in China and the West. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
MacKenzieDonald. 1976. “Eugenics in Britain.” Social Studies of Science 6(3/4): 499532.
MillerCary. 2010. Ogimaag: Anishinaabeg Leadership, 1760–1845. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.
OccamSampson. 2006. The Collected Writings of Samson Occom, Mohegan. Ed. BrooksJoanna. Literature and Leadership in Eighteenth-Century Native America. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
O’ConnellBarry, ed. 1992. On Our Own Ground: The Complete Writings of William Apess, a Pequot. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.
RossDorothy. 1993. “The Development of the Social Sciences.” In Discipline and History: Political Science in the United States, ed. FarrJames and SeidelmanRaymond. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
SeeleySir John Robert. 1896. Introduction to Political Science: Two Series of Lectures. London: Macmillan.
SeligerMartin. 1968. The Liberal Politics of John Locke. New York: Frederick A.
SimpsonAudra. 2014. Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life across the Borders of Settler States. Durham: Duke University Press.
SantosBoaventura de Sousa. 2012. “Public Sphere and Epistemologies of the South” Africa Development 37(1): 4367.
TookerElisabeth. 1988. “The United States Constitution and the Iroquois League.” Ethnohistory 35(4): 305–36.
TurnerDale. 2006. This Is Not a Peace Pipe: Towards a Critical Indigenous Philosophy. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
UnitedNations. 2007. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. New York: United Nations.
United States Federal Register, 2015 United States Federal Register . 2015. January 14: 80(9): 1942–48.
VimalasseryManu, PeguesJuliana Hu, and GoldsteinAlyosha. 2016. “On Colonial Unknowing.” Theory & Event 19(4).
VizenorGerald. 1999. Manifest Manners: Narratives on Postindian Survivance. Lincoln: Nebraska.
VizenorGerald and DoerflerJill, eds. 2012. The White Earth Nation: Ratification of a Native Democratic Constitution. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.
WadsworthNancy. 2014. “Unsettling Lessons: Teaching Indigenous Politics and Settler Colonialism in Political Science.” PS: Political Science & Politics 47(3): 692–69.
WilkinsDavid E. 1997. American Indian Sovereignty and the U.S. Supreme Court: The Masking of Justice. Austin: University of Texas Press.
WilmerFranke, MelodyMichael E., and MurdockMargaret Maier. 1994. “Including Native American Perspectives in the Political Science Curriculum.” PS: Political Science and Politics 27(2): 269–76.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Perspectives on Politics
  • ISSN: 1537-5927
  • EISSN: 1541-0986
  • URL: /core/journals/perspectives-on-politics
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 127
Total number of PDF views: 662 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 1294 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 28th December 2016 - 22nd October 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.