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Cognitive Attitudes and Values in Science

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2022

Abstract

We argue that the analysis of cognitive attitudes should play a central role in developing more sophisticated accounts of the proper roles for values in science. First, we show that the major recent efforts to delineate appropriate roles for values in science would be strengthened by making clearer distinctions among cognitive attitudes. Next, we turn to a specific example and argue that a more careful account of the distinction between the attitudes of belief and acceptance can contribute to a better understanding of the proper roles for values in a case study from paleoanthropology.

Type
General Philosophy of Science
Copyright
Copyright © The Philosophy of Science Association

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Footnotes

We would like to thank Ulrich Krohs, Bertolt Lampe, Fabian Lausen, and participants at the 2012 PSA meeting in San Diego for very helpful feedback on this article.

References

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