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Color Constancy, Illumination, and Matching

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2022

Abstract

Color constancy is a foundational and yet puzzling phenomenon. Standard appearance invariantism is threatened by the psychophysical matching argument, which is taken to favor variantism. This argument, however, is inconclusive. The data at best support a pluralist view: color constancy is sometimes variantist, sometimes invariantist. I add another potential explanation of these data, complex invariantism, which adopts an atypical six-dimensional model of color appearance. Finally, I prospect for a unifying conception of constancy among two neglected notions: discriminatory color constancy and relational color constancy. The former arguably marks a common core capacity that is present across widely differing viewing contexts.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Philosophy of Science Association

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Footnotes

Thanks to three anonymous reviewers for their extremely helpful comments.

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