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Resituating Knowledge: Generic Strategies and Case Studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2022

Abstract

This paper addresses the problem of how scientific knowledge, which is always locally generated, becomes accepted in other sites. The analysis suggests that there are a small number of strategies that enable scientists to resituate knowledge and that these strategies are generic: they are not restricted to specific disciplines or modes of doing science but rather are found in a variety of different forms across the sciences.

Type
Medical and Social Sciences
Information
Philosophy of Science , Volume 81 , Issue 5 , December 2014 , pp. 1012 - 1024
Copyright
Copyright © The Philosophy of Science Association

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Footnotes

Thanks to the British Academy and Wolfson Foundation for funding my research project “Re-thinking Case Studies across the Social Sciences.” I thank participants at the PSA 2012 Symposium on comparability and cases, Rachel Ankeny, Attilia Ruzzene, Ted Porter, and especially Sharon Crasnow and Stephen Turner, for their comments.

References

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