Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-z6b88 Total loading time: 0.186 Render date: 2022-11-28T11:40:49.958Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Using Meta-Scientific Studies to Clarify or Resolve Questions in the Philosophy and History of Science

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2022

David Faust*
Affiliation:
University of Rhode Island
Paul E. Meehl*
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
*
Send requests for reprints to the authors. David Faust: Department of Psychology, 10 Chaffe Rd., Suite 8, Kingston, RI 02881. Paul Meehl: Department of Psychology, 75 E. River Rd., Elliot Hall, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
Send requests for reprints to the authors. David Faust: Department of Psychology, 10 Chaffe Rd., Suite 8, Kingston, RI 02881. Paul Meehl: Department of Psychology, 75 E. River Rd., Elliot Hall, Minneapolis, MN 55455.

Abstract

More powerful methods for studying and integrating the historical track record of scientific episodes and scientific judgment, or what Faust and Meehl describe as a program of meta-science and meta-scientific studies, can supplement and extend more commonly used case study methods. We describe the basic premises of meta-science, overview methodological considerations, and provide examples of meta-scientific studies. Meta-science can help to clarify or resolve long-standing questions in the history and philosophy of science and provide practical help to the working scientist.

Type
Research Article
Information
Philosophy of Science , Volume 69 , Issue S3 , September 2002 , pp. S185 - S196
Copyright
Copyright © The Philosophy of Science Association

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Connolly, Terry, Arkes, Hal R., and Hammond, Kenneth R. (eds.) (2000), Judgment and Decision Making, 2nd ed. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Dawes, Robyn M., Faust, David, and Meehl, Paul E (1989), “Clinical Versus Actuarial Judgment”, Clinical Versus Actuarial Judgment 243:16681674.Google ScholarPubMed
Einhorn, Hillel J. (1972), “Expert Measurement and Mechanical Combination”, Expert Measurement and Mechanical Combination 7:86106.Google Scholar
Faust, David (1984), The Limits of Scientific Reasoning. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
Faust, David, and Meehl, Paul E. (1992), “Using Scientific Methods to Resolve Enduring Questions within the History and Philosophy of Science: Some Illustrations”, Using Scientific Methods to Resolve Enduring Questions within the History and Philosophy of Science: Some Illustrations 23:195211.Google Scholar
Grove, William M., and Meehl, Paul E. (1996), “Comparative Efficiency of Informal (Subjective, Impressionistic) and Formal (Mechanical, Algorithmic) Prediction Procedures: The Clinical-Statistical Controversy”, Comparative Efficiency of Informal (Subjective, Impressionistic) and Formal (Mechanical, Algorithmic) Prediction Procedures: The Clinical-Statistical Controversy 2:131.Google Scholar
Laudan, Larry, Donovan, Arthur, Laudan, Rachel, Barker, Peter, Brown, Harold, Leplin, Jarrett, Thagard, Paul, and Wykstra, Steve (1986), “Scientific Change: Philosophical Models and Historical Research”, Scientific Change: Philosophical Models and Historical Research 69:141223.Google Scholar
Meehl, Paul E. (1954), Clinical Versus Statistical Prediction: A Theoretical Analysis and a Review of the Evidence. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press. Reprinted with new preface, 1996, by Jason Aronson, Northvale, NJ.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meehl, Paul E. (1983), “Subjectivity in Psychoanalytic Inference: The Nagging Persistence of Wilhelm Fleiss’s Achensee Question”, in Earman, John (ed.), Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science: Vol. 10, Testing Scientific Theories Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 349411.Google Scholar
Meehl, Paul E. (1986), “Causes and Effects of My Disturbing Little Book”, Causes and Effects of My Disturbing Little Book 50:370375.Google ScholarPubMed
Meehl, Paul E. (1992a), “Cliometric Metatheory: The Actuarial Approach to Empirical, History-Based Philosophy of Science”, Cliometric Metatheory: The Actuarial Approach to Empirical, History-Based Philosophy of Science 71:339467.Google Scholar
Meehl, Paul E. (1992b). “The Miracle Argument for Realism: An Important Lesson to Be Learned by Generalizing from Carrier’s Counter-Examples”, Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 23:267282.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meehl, Paul E. (1997), “The Problem is Epistemology, Not Statistics: Replace Significance Tests by Confidence Intervals and Quantify Accuracy of Risky Numerical Predictions”, in Harlow, Lisa L., Mulaik, Stanley A., and Steiger, James H. (eds.), What If there Were No Significance Tests? Mahwah, N.J.: Erlbaum, 393425.Google Scholar
Meehl, Paul E. (1999), “How to Weight Scientists’ Probabilities is not a Big Problem: Comment on Barnes”, How to Weight Scientists’ Probabilities is not a Big Problem: Comment on Barnes 50:283295.Google Scholar
Popper, Karl R. (1983), Postscript (Volume I): Realism and the Aim of Science. Totowa, N.J.: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
Sulloway, Frank J. (1996), Born to Rebel: Birth Order, Family Dynamics, and Creative Lives. New York: Pantheon Books.Google Scholar
26
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Using Meta-Scientific Studies to Clarify or Resolve Questions in the Philosophy and History of Science
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Using Meta-Scientific Studies to Clarify or Resolve Questions in the Philosophy and History of Science
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Using Meta-Scientific Studies to Clarify or Resolve Questions in the Philosophy and History of Science
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *