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Reparative Justice for Climate Refugees

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 April 2019

Abstract

This paper sketches an account of reparative justice for climate refugees, focusing on total land loss due to sea-level rise. I begin by outlining the harm of this loss in terms of self-determination and cultural heritage. I then consider, first, who is owed these reparations? Second, who should pay such reparations? Third, in what form should the reparations be paid? I end with thoughts on the project of reparative justice more generally, arguing that such obligations do not depend upon a perfect account of how reparations might be fulfilled; we simply have an obligation to shoot the arrow as close to the target as we can.

Type
Winner of the 2018 Philosophy prize essay competition
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal Institute of Philosophy 2019 

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References

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Ibid

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Ibid

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60 Ibid, 382

Ibid

61 Ibid, 383

Ibid

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65 See, for example, the displacement solutions generated for small island states and the Tuvalu HLD initiative: http://displacementsolutions.org/ds-initiatives/climate-change-and-displacement-initiative/tuvalu-climate-displacement

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Ibid

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70 Ibid, 481

Ibid

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77 C. Nine (2012) Global Justice and Territory, 163

78 Government of Tuvalu (2015) ‘Intended Nationally Determined Contributions: Communicated to the UNFCC on November 27 2015’, available at: http://www4.unfccc.int/ndcregistry/PublishedDocuments/Tuvalu%20First/TUVALU%20INDC.pdf

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