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Phonological constituents and their movement in Latin*

  • Brian Agbayani (a1) and Chris Golston (a1)
Abstract

We document a fronting process in Latin that is difficult to model as syntactic movement but fairly easy to model as phonological movement. Movement with similar properties has been observed elsewhere in Classical Greek, Russian, Irish and Japanese; we suggest that the Latin movement is of the same type and takes place in the phonological component of the grammar, following the mapping from syntactic to prosodic structure.

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Corresponding author
E-mail: bagbayan@csufresno.edu, chrisg@csufresno.edu.
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For helpful comments and questions we'd like to thank audiences at Auckland University, Stockholm University, California State University, Fresno, the University of California, Santa Cruz, the UCLA Indo-European Conference, the Annual Meeting on Phonology at MIT, ‘Parallel domains: a workshop in honor of Jean-Roger Vergnaud at the University of Southern California’ and ‘The prosodic hierarchy in a typological perspective’ at Stockholm University. Special thanks to A. M. Devine, Lawrence Stephens and Ben Fortson for help with the Latin, to three anonymous reviewers at Phonology and to Arto Anttila for helping us clarify the presentation of our ideas. Any errors of data and/or analysis are our own.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

J. N. Adams (1995). The language of the Vindolanda writing tablets: an interim report. Journal of Roman Studies 85. 86134.

Geert Booij (1996). Cliticization as prosodic integration: the case of Dutch. The Linguistic Review 13. 219242.

Daniel Büring (2013). Syntax, information structure and prosody. In Marcel den Dikken (ed.) The Cambridge handbook of generative syntax. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 860895.

A. M. Devine & Laurence D. Stephens (2006). Latin word order: structured meaning and information. Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press.

Kleanthes K. Grohmann (2002). Anti-locality and clause types. Theoretical Linguistics 28. 4372.

Junko Ito & Armin Mester (2013). Prosodic subcategories in Japanese. Lingua 124. 2040.

J. G. F. Powell (2010). Hyperbaton and register in Cicero. In Eleanor Dickey & Anna Chahoud (eds.) Colloquial and literary Latin. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 163185.

Robert S. Radford (1904). On the recession of the Latin accent in connection with monosyllabic words and the traditional word-order. Part 1. American Journal of Philology 25. 147162.

Elisabeth Selkirk (2011). The syntax–phonology interface. In John A. Goldsmith , Jason Riggle & Alan C. L. Yu (eds.) The handbook of phonological theory. 2nd edn.Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. 435484.

Margaret J. Speas (1990). Phrase structure in natural language. Dordrecht: Kluwer.

Olga Spevak (2010). Constituent order in Classical Latin prose. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: Benjamins.

Jacob Wackernagel (1892). Über ein Gesetz der indo-germanischen Wortstellung. Indogermanische Forschungen 1. 333436.

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Phonology
  • ISSN: 0952-6757
  • EISSN: 1469-8188
  • URL: /core/journals/phonology
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