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Why So Slow? The Challenges of Gendering Comparative Politics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2006

Aili Mari Tripp
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin at Madison

Extract

One of my most painful memories as a newly minted assistant professor was of giving a talk at a U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) meeting on democratization in Africa, during which senior Africanist political scientists (Americans) continued their private discussions while I tried to deliver a paper on women and democratization in Africa. My voice carried weakly over the din. I was too intent on getting through my prepared talk in the allotted time to do what I should have done, which was to stop until I got their full attention. I remember thinking at the time that I had something very important to say that they needed to hear, and they were missing this opportunity. That was 1994.

Type
CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER AND POLITICS
Copyright
© 2006 The Women and Politics Research Section of the American Political Science Association

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References

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