Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-k9l4c Total loading time: 0.362 Render date: 2023-02-03T07:54:08.615Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Women in International Relations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 March 2008

Daniel Maliniak
Affiliation:
University of California San Diego
Amy Oakes
Affiliation:
College of William and Mary
Susan Peterson
Affiliation:
College of William and Mary
Michael J. Tierney
Affiliation:
College of William and Mary

Extract

Women now receive political science degrees in record numbers, but female representation among political science faculty still lags behind that of many other disciplines. Only 26% of the 13,000 political science professors in the United States today are women (Sedowski and Brintall 2007). According to our recent survey of international relations faculty in the United States—the 2006 Teaching, Research, and International Politics (TRIP) Survey—women comprise an even smaller proportion of IR scholars: 77% of the IR faculty respondents are men, while only 23% are women. Even more than their counterparts in the wider field of political science, women in IR tend to be more junior and less likely to hold tenure than their male colleagues. Women comprise a minority at every level of the profession, but they are most scarce at the full professor level: Only 17% of political science professors and 14% of IR professors are women (Maliniak et al. 2007c; Sedowski and Brintall 2007).

Type
Critical Perspectives on Gender and Politics
Copyright
Copyright © The Women and Politics Research Section of the American Political Science Association 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Anonymous, and Anonymous. 1999. “Tenure in a Chilly Climate.” PS: Political Science and Politics 32 (1): 9199.Google Scholar
Blackburn, Robert J., and Lawrence, Janet H. 1995. Faculty at Work: Motivation, Expectation, Satisfaction. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
Boyd, Frank A. Jr. 2001. “Taking It to the Street: The Demographics of Pedagogy of APSA's ‘Star’ Teachers.” PS: Political Science and Politics 34 (3): 669–73.Google Scholar
Breuning, Marijke, Bredehoft, Joseph, and Walton, Eugene. 2005. “Promise and Performance: An Evaluation of Journals in International Relations.” International Studies Perspectives 6 (4): 458.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Committee on the Status of Women. 1992. “Improving the Status of Women in Political Science: A Report with Recommendations.” PS: Political Science and Politics 25 (3): 547–54.Google Scholar
Committee on the Status of Women in the Profession. 2001. “The Status of Women in Political Science: Female Participation in the Professoriate and the Study of Women in Politics in the Discipline.” PS: Political Science and Politics 34 (2): 319–26.Google Scholar
Converse, Philip, and Converse, Jean 1971. “The Status of Women as Students and Professionals in Political Science.” PS: Political Science and Politics 4 (3): 328–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Creamer, Elizabeth. 1998. “Assessing Faculty Publication Productivity: Issues of Equity.” Washington DC: Graduate School of Education and Human Development, George Washington University.Google Scholar
Dinauer, Leslie D., and Ondeck, Kristen E. 1999. “Gender and Institutional Affiliation as Determinants of Publishing in Human Communications Research.” Human Communication Research 25 (4): 548–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fisher, Bonnie, Cobane, Craig T.Vander Ven, Thomas, and Cullen, Francis T. 1998. “How Many Authors Does It Take to Publish an Article? Trends and Patterns in Political Science.” PS: Political Science and Politics 31 (4): 847856Google Scholar
Gruberg, Martin. 2007. “Participation by Women in the 2006 APSA Annual Meeting.” PS: Political Science and Politics 40 (1): 157–58.Google Scholar
Hesli, Vicki, and Burrell, Barbara. 1995. “Faculty Rank among Political Scientists and Reports on the Academic Environment: The Differential Impact of Gender on Observed Patterns.” PS: Political Science and Politics 28 (1): 101–11.Google Scholar
Hesli, Vicki, Fink, Evelyn, and Duffy, Diane 2003a. “Mentoring in Positive Graduate Student Experience: Survey Results from the Midwest Region, Part 1.” PS: Political Science and Politics 36 (3): 457–60.Google Scholar
Hesli, Vicki, Fink, Evelyn, and Duffy, Diane. 2003b. “The Role of Faculty in Creating a Positive Graduate Student Experience: Survey Results from the Midwest Region, Part III.” PS: Political Science and Politics 36 (3): 801–4.Google Scholar
Hesli, Vicki, Fink, Evelyn, and Duffy, Diane. 2006. “Success in Graduate School and After: Survey Results from the Midwest Region, Part III.” PS: Political Science and Politics 39 (1): 317–25.Google Scholar
Hexler, J. H. 1975. “The Burden of Proof.” Times Literary Supplement, 24 October.Google Scholar
Lewis, Lionel. 1975. Scaling the Ivory Tower: Merit and Its Limits in Academic Careers. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
Long, J. Scott. 1990. “The Origins of Sex Differences in Science.” Social Forces 68 (4): 1297–315.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maliniak, Daniel, Oakes, Amy, Peterson, Susan, and Tierney, Michael J. 2007a. “Inside the Ivory TowerForeign Policy 40 (2): 6268.Google Scholar
Maliniak, Daniel, Oakes, Amy, Peterson, Susan, and Tierney, Michael J. 2007b. “The International Relations, 1980–2006.” Paper presented at American Political Science Association Meeting Chicago.Google Scholar
Maliniak, Daniel, Oakes, Amy, Peterson, Susan, and Tierney, Michael J. 2007c. “The View from the Ivory Tower: TRIP Survey of International Relations Faculty in the United States and Canada.” Williamsburg, VA: Program on the Theory and Practice of International Relations, College of William and Mary.Google Scholar
Mann, Sheilah. 1998. “Political Science Departments Report Declines in Enrollments and Majors in Recent Years.” PS: Political Science and Politics 29 (3): 527–33.Google Scholar
Masuoka, Natalie, Bernard, Grofman, and Scott, Feld 2007. “The Politcal Science 400: A 20-Year Update.” PS: Political Science and Politics 40 (1): 139–40.Google Scholar
Mathews, A. Lanethea, and Anderson, Kristi 2001. “A Gender Gap in Publishing? Women's Representation in Edited Political Science Books.” PS: Political Science and Politics 34 (1): 144.Google Scholar
McElrath, Karen. 1992. “Gender, Career Disruption, and Academic Rewards.” Journal of Higher Education 63 (3): 269–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Monroe, Kristen R. 2002. “Cracking the Glass Ceiling—Keeping it Broken.” PS: Political Science and Politics 35 (2): 237242.Google Scholar
Monroe, Kristen R. 2003. “Mentoring in Political Science.” PS: Political Science and Politics 36 (1): 9396.Google Scholar
Roland, Catherine B., and Fontanesi-Seime, Margaret 1996. “Women Counselor Educators: A Survey of Publication Activity.” Journal of Counseling and Development 74 (3): 490–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sandler, Bernice R. 1991. “Women Faculty at Work in the Classroom, or, Why It Still Hurts to Be a Woman in Labor.” Washington, DC: Center for Women Policy Studies.Google Scholar
Sarkees, Meredith R., and McGlen, Nancy E. 1992. “Confronting Barriers: The Status of Women in Political Science.” Women and Politics 12 (4): 4348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schneider, Alison. 1998. “Why Don't Women Publish as Much as Men?Chronicle of Higher Education 45 (3): A14A16.Google Scholar
Sedowski, Leanne. 2007. “Trends in Numbers of Degrees Earned in Political Science, 1990–2004.” PS: Political Science and Politics 40 (1): 180–81.Google Scholar
Sedowski, Leanne, and Brintall, Michael 2007. “Data Snapshot: The Proportion of Women in the Political Science Profession.” PS: Political Science and Politics 40 (1–3).Google Scholar
Simeone, Angela. 1986. Academic Women: Working Towards Equality. New York: Bergin & Garvey.Google Scholar
Sjoberg, Laura, and Gentry, Caron E. 2007. Mothers, Monsters, and Whores: Women's Violence in Global Politics. London: Zed Books.Google Scholar
Smith, Steve. 1998. “Unacceptable Conclusions and the ‘Man’ Question: Masculinity, Gender, and International Relations.” In The Man Question in International Relations, ed. Zalewski, M. and Parpart, J.Boulder: Westview Press: 123141.Google Scholar
Tickner, J. Ann. 2001. Gendering World Politics: Issues and Approaches in the Post–Cold War era. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Van Assendelft, Laura, Gunther-Canada, Wendy, Dolan, Julie, Palmer, Barbara, and Michele, Swers 2003. “Political Science in a Different Voice: Women Faculty Perspectives on the Status of Women in Political Science Departments in the South.” PS: Political Science and Politics 36 (2): 312.Google Scholar
Young, Cheryl D. 1995. “An Assessment of Articles Published by Women in Top 15 Political Science Journals.” PS: Political Science and Politics 28 (3): 525–33.Google Scholar
17
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Women in International Relations
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Women in International Relations
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Women in International Relations
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *