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Why Aren't There More Republican Women in Congress? Gender, Partisanship, and Fundraising Support in the 2010 and 2012 Elections

  • Karin E. Kitchens (a1) and Michele L. Swers (a1)
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      Why Aren't There More Republican Women in Congress? Gender, Partisanship, and Fundraising Support in the 2010 and 2012 Elections
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Politics & Gender
  • ISSN: 1743-923X
  • EISSN: 1743-9248
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