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Call for papers

The Editors of Politics and Gender are seeking submissions for two forthcoming special issues.

Michelle Obama’s Legacy

Politics & Gender invites essays on the topic of Michelle Obama’s legacy and how she interpreted the role of First Lady.  We seek essays that address various aspects of her legacy as the first African-American woman to inhabit the White House.  Topics might include, but are not limited to, her focus on the dangers of industrialized food, the spread of diabetes and hypertension among American children, the rise in obesity among the young, and need for Americans to take control of their health.  We encourage submissions that combine racial, gendered, and intersectional themes with the defining attributes of Michelle Obama’s tenure as First Lady: e.g., her garden initiative and the anti-corporate politics of food activism; the sorry state of American public health: fighting agribusiness through education; redefining the role of First Lady (in the garden in her jeans); “Let’s Move!” – the most physically fit First Lady ever?; what is unique about Michelle Obama’s legacy?; Michelle Obama: a progressive, polarizing figure?  We encourage useful theoretical frameworks that engage gendered, racial, and intersectional themes in ways that help focus the essays and draw out their pertinence to the currently polarized American political scene.  Essays should not be more that 30 pages in length and should include footnotes or endnotes.

Ecofeminism and the Polarized Politics of Climate Change

Politics & Gender also invites essays that address the topics of ecofeminism and climate change. We seek essays that analyze climate change from an international perspective as well as in the American context, paying attention to the rise of conservative social movements and the role of ecofeminism in such a politicized climate.   Topics might include, but need not be limited to, the following: ecofeminism under a Trump presidency; a comparative analysis of climate change policy between the United States and other nations: does conservatism spell a disbelief in climate change elsewhere?  The ideology of American conspicuous consumption: can we reduce our carbon footprint with global warming skeptics at the helm?  Ecofeminism/intersectionality and the North Dakota pipeline protest.  We encourage useful theoretical frameworks that engage gendered, racial, and intersectional themes in ways that help focus the essays and draw out their pertinence to the currently polarized American political scene.  Essays should not be more that 30 pages in length and should include footnotes or endnotes.

You can find out how to submit your paper for both of these issues by following this link.