Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-xl52z Total loading time: 0.513 Render date: 2021-04-19T05:28:27.080Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Beyond ‘puffins and moss’: Iceland Airwaves and post-crash musical tourism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 March 2021

Kimberly D. Cannady
Affiliation:
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Abstract

This article explores relationships between the significant growth of foreign tourism to Iceland, following the 2008 economic crash, and the popular music festival Iceland Airwaves. I consider the effects of Iceland Airwaves on popular music in Reykjavík during the festival and outside of the festival season. My focus is primarily on how the local population experiences Iceland Airwaves and musical tourism in general. Based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Iceland between 2010 and 2018, I examine how musicians, politicians, festival management, tourism sector workers, business people, and other music industry workers approach and negotiate the rising role of popular music in Iceland's new tourism economy. This research contributes to broader understandings of how music festivals and musical tourism shape local musical life year-round, and it also offers insight into Iceland's internationally renowned popular music industry.

Type
Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Bohlman, P.V. 2017. ‘Musical borealism: Nordic music and European history’, in The Oxford Handbook of Popular Music in the Nordic Countries, ed. Holt, F. and Kärjä, A.-V. (New York, Oxford University Press), pp. 3356Google Scholar
Bruner, E.M. 2001. ‘The Maasai and the Lion King: authenticity, nationalism, and globalization in African tourism’, American Ethnologist, 28/4, pp. 881908Google Scholar
Brydon, A. 1989. ‘Returning to the present: Icelandic identity and the festival’, The Icelandic Canadian, 48/2, pp. 1319Google Scholar
Cannady, K. 2014. History on their Shoulders: Music and Nation-Building in Iceland. PhD thesis, University of WashingtonGoogle Scholar
Cannady, K. 2017. ‘Echoes of the colonial past in discourse on North Atlantic popular music’, in The Oxford Handbook of Popular Music in the Nordic Countries, ed. Holt, F. and Kärjä, A.-V. (New York, Oxford University Press), pp. 203–18Google Scholar
de Peuter, G. 2012. ‘Confronting precarity in the Warhol economy’, Journal of Cultural Economy, 7/1, pp. 3147Google Scholar
Gamma. 2018 Tourism in Iceland: Investing in Iceland's Growth Engine (London, Gamma Advisory)Google Scholar
Getz, D. 2005. Event Management and Event Tourism (2nd ed.) (New York, Cognizant)Google Scholar
Getz, D. 2008. ‘Event tourism: definition, evolution, and research’, Tourism Management, 29, pp. 403–28CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gibson, C., and Connell, J. 2012. Music Festivals and Regional Development in Australia (Burlington, VT, Ashgate)Google Scholar
Gössling, S. 2006. ‘Iceland’, in Extreme Tourism: Lessons from the World's Cold Water Islands, ed. Baldacchino, G. (Oxford, Elsevier), pp. 115127Google Scholar
Grétarsdóttir, T, Ásmundsson, Á., and Lárusson, H. 2015. ‘Creativity and crisis’, in Gambling Debt: Iceland's Rise and Fall in the Global Economy, ed. Durrenberger, E.P. and Pálsson, G. (Boulder, CO, University Press of Colorado), pp. 93108Google Scholar
Iceland Naturally. n.d. ‘Contact us’, https://www.icelandnaturally.com/contact-us (accessed 23 August 2018)Google Scholar
Jóhannesson, G.T., and Huijbens, E.H. 2010. ‘Tourism in times of crisis: exploring the discourse of tourism development in Iceland’, Current Issues in Tourism, 13/5, pp. 419–34CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jóhannsdóttir, H. 2006. ‘Under the tourist gaze’, in The Cultural Reconstruction of Places, ed. Eysteinsson, Á. (Reykjavík, University of Iceland Press), pp. 111121Google Scholar
Loftsdóttir, K., and Lund, K.A. 2016. ‘Þingvellir: commodifying the “heart” of Iceland’, in Postcolonial Perspectives on the European High North, ed. Huggan, G. and Jensen, L. (London, Palgrave Macmillan), pp. 117–41Google Scholar
Loftsdóttir, K, Kjartansdóttir, K., and Lund, K.A. 2017. ‘Trapped in clichés: masculinity, films and tourism in Iceland’, Gender, Place & Culture, 24/9, pp. 1225–42CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lund, A., Loftsdóttir, K., and Leonard, M. 2017. ‘More than a stopover: analysing the postcolonial image of Iceland as a gateway destination’, Tourist Studies, 17/2, pp. 144–63CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Matthíasson, Á., 2014. ‘Entertaining Indigenes’, The Grapevine, 27 October. https://grapevine.is/culture/music/airwaves/2014/10/27/entertaining-indigenes/ (accessed 23 August 2018)Google Scholar
Meadows, R. 2014. ‘“Jockomo Fee Na Nay!”: Afro-Caribbean and Afro-Creole Sensorialities and the Festivalization of New Orleans’ Musical Tourism’, in Sun, Sea, and Sound: Music and Tourism in the Circum-Caribbean, Rommen, T. & Neely, D. (New York, Oxford University Press), pp. 238265Google Scholar
Oslund, K. 2011. Iceland Imagined: Nature, Culture, and Storytelling in the North Atlantic (Seattle, WA, University of Washington Press)Google Scholar
Ólafsdóttir, R., and Runnström, M.C. 2013. ‘Assessing hiking trails condition in two popular tourist destinations in the Icelandic highlands’, Journal of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism, 3–4, pp. 57–67Google Scholar
Prentice, R., and Andersen, V. 2003. ‘Festival as creative destination’, Annals of Tourism Research, 30/1, pp. 730Google Scholar
Prior, N. 2015. ‘“It's a social thing, not a nature thing”: popular music practices in Reykjavík, Iceland’, Cultural Sociology, 9/1, pp. 8198CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pruett, D.B. 2011. ‘When the tribe goes triple platinum: a case study toward an ethnomusicology of mainstream popular music in the U.S.’, Ethnomusicology, 55/1, pp. 130CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ritchie, J.R.B. 1984. ‘Assessing the impacts of hallmark events: conceptual and research issues’, Journal of Travel Research, 23/1, pp. 211CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rommen, T. 2014. ‘Introduction: music touristics in the Circum-Caribbean’, in Sun, Sea, and Sound: Music and Tourism in the Circum-Caribbean, ed. Rommen, T. & Neely, D. (New York, Oxford University Press), pp. 116Google Scholar
Schram, K. 2011. ‘Borealism: folkloristic perspectives on transnational performances and the exoticism of the North’. PhD dissertation, University of EdinburghGoogle Scholar
Sigurðardóttir, M.S., and Young, T. 2011. Towards Creative Iceland: Building Local, Going Global. http://www.icelanddesign.is/media/PDF/towardscreativeicelandreport1.pdf (accessed 23 August 2018)Google Scholar
Stefánsson, Þ., Sæþórsdóttir, A.D., and Hall, C.M. 2017. ‘When tourists meet transmission lines: the effects of electric transmission lines on tourism in Iceland’, Energy Research and Social Science, 34, pp. 8292Google Scholar
Størvold, T. 2018. ‘Sigur Rós: reception, borealism, and musical style’, Popular Music, 37/3, pp. 371–91Google Scholar
World Bank. n.d. International Tourism, Number of Arrivals. https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/ST.INT.ARVL?locations=IS&view=chart. (accessed 23 August 2018)Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 7
Total number of PDF views: 12 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 19th March 2021 - 19th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Beyond ‘puffins and moss’: Iceland Airwaves and post-crash musical tourism
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Beyond ‘puffins and moss’: Iceland Airwaves and post-crash musical tourism
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Beyond ‘puffins and moss’: Iceland Airwaves and post-crash musical tourism
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *