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    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Hedegard, Danielle 2015. Transnational connections: The meaning of global culture in the tastes of Brazilian elites. Poetics, Vol. 53, p. 52.

    Packman, 2011. Musicians' Performances and Performances of "Musician" in Salvador da Bahia, Brazil. Ethnomusicology, Vol. 55, Issue. 3, p. 414.

    Perry, Marc D. 2008. GLOBAL BLACK SELF-FASHIONINGS: HIP HOP AS DIASPORIC SPACE. Identities, Vol. 15, Issue. 6, p. 635.

    Dowd, Timothy J. 2004. The embeddedness of cultural industries. Poetics, Vol. 32, Issue. 1, p. 1.


Adopting imports: new images and alliances in Brazilian popular music of the 1990s1


Anyone visiting Brazil today in search of an idealised ‘Brazilian Sound’ might, at first, be disappointed with the popular music scene. The visitor will soon realise that established musical styles such as bossa nova and MPB (Música Popular Brazileira (Brazilian Popular Music)), with their well-defined roles within the Brazilian social and political scene of the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s, have lost their immediate appeal with some contemporary audiences, and especially with Brazilian urban youth. In the 1990s, Brazilian radio and TV are saturated with a variety of new local genres that borrow heavily from international musical styles of all kinds and use state-of-the-art electronic apparatus. Hybrid terms such as samba-rock, samba-reggae, mangue-beat, afro-beat, for-rock (a contraction of forró and rock), sertaneja-country, samba-rap, and pop-nejo (a contraction of pop and sertanejo), are just a few examples of the marketing labels which are loosely applied to the current infusion of international music in the local musical scene.

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Jody Berland . 1988. ‘Locating listening: technological space, popular music, Canadian meditations’, Cultural Studies, 2, 3, pp. 343–58

Philip Galinsky . 1996. ‘Co-option, cultural resistance, and Afro-Brazilian identity: a history of the “Pagode” Samba Movement in Rio de Janeiro’, Latin American Music Review, 17, 2, pp. 120–49

Cheryl Keyes . 1996. ‘At the crossroads: rap music and its African nexus’, Ethnomusicology, 40, 2, pp. 223–48

Dave Laing . 1986. ‘The music industry and the “Cultural Imperialism” thesis’, Media, Culture and Society, 8, pp. 331–41

René T. A. Lysloff 1997. ‘Mozart in mirrorshades: ethnomusicology, technology, and the politics of representation’, Ethnomusicology, 41, 2, pp. 206–19

Angelica Madeira . 1991. ‘Rhythm and irreverence: notes about the rock music movement in Brasília’, Popular Music and Society, 15, 4, pp. 5870

Benjamin Orlove , and Arnold Bauer . 1997. ‘Giving importance to imports’, in The Allure of the Foreign: Imported Goods in Postcolonial Latin American, ed. Benjamin Orlove (Ann Arbor)

R. Anderson Sutton . 1996. ‘Interpreting electronic sound technology in the contemporary Javanese soundscape’, Ethnomusicology, 40, 2, pp. 249–68

Robert Walser . 1995. ‘Rhythm, rhyme, and rhetoric in the music of Public Enemy’, Ethnomusicology, 39, pp. 193217

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Popular Music
  • ISSN: 0261-1430
  • EISSN: 1474-0095
  • URL: /core/journals/popular-music
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