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Patient-Driven Resource Planning of a Health Care Facility Evacuation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 January 2013

Bruno Petinaux*
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC USA
Kabir Yadav
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC USA
*
Correspondence: Bruno Petinaux, MD Department of Emergency Medicine The George Washington University 2150 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20037 USA E-mail bpetinaux@mfa.gwu.edu

Abstract

Introduction

The evacuation of a health care facility is a complex undertaking, especially if done in an immediate fashion, ie, within minutes. Patient factors, such as continuous medical care needs, mobility, and comprehension, will affect the efficiency of the evacuation and translate into evacuation resource needs. Prior evacuation resource estimates are 30 years old.

Methods

Utilizing a cross-sectional survey of charge nurses of the clinical units in an urban, academic, adult trauma health care facility (HCF), the evacuation needs of hospitalized patients were assessed periodically over a two-year period.

Results

Survey data were collected on 2,050 patients. Units with patients having low continuous medical care needs during an emergency evacuation were the postpartum, psychiatry, rehabilitation medicine, surgical, and preoperative anesthesia care units, the Emergency Department, and Labor and Delivery Department (with the exception of patients in Stage II labor). Units with patients having high continuous medical care needs during an evacuation included the neonatal and adult intensive care units, special procedures unit, and operating and post-anesthesia care units. With the exception of the neonate group, 908 (47%) of the patients would be able to walk out of the facility, 492 (25.5%) would require a wheelchair, and 530 (27.5%) would require a stretcher to exit the HCF. A total of 1,639 patients (84.9%) were deemed able to comprehend the need to evacuate and to follow directions; the remainder were sedated, blind, or deaf. The charge nurses also determined that 17 (6.9%) of the 248 adult intensive care unit patients were too ill to survive an evacuation, and that in 10 (16.4%) of the 61 ongoing surgery cases, stopping the case was not considered to be safe.

Conclusion

Heath care facilities can utilize the results of this study to model their anticipated resource requirements for an emergency evacuation. This will permit the Incident Management Team to mobilize the necessary resources both within the facility and the community to provide for the safest evacuation of patients.

PetinauxB, YadavK. Patient-Driven Resource Planning of a Health Care Facility Evacuation. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2013;28(2):1-7.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2012

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