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Kepler, Galileo and the birth of modern astronomy

  • Owen Gingerich (a1)
Abstract

The International Year of Astronomy marks the 400th anniversary of Kepler's Astronomia nova and the first use of the telescope for astronomy, most notably leading to Galileo's Sidereus nuncius (1610). Kepler's book for the first time argued strongly for a physical basis to astronomical explanations. Galileo's work showed that a coherent understanding was more important for scientific progress than specific proofs. The efforts of both astronomers undermined the traditional geocentric cosmology and essentially brought about the birth of modern astronomy.

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References
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Donahue, W. 1992, (translator) Johannes Kepler: New Astronomy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)
Drake, S. 1987, (translator and commentator), Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo (Garden City: Doubleday)
Gingerich, G. 1993, The Eye of Heaven: Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler (New York: American Institute of Physics)
Gingerich, G. 1995, in Galileo a Padova 1592-1610, IV, Tribute to Galileo in Padua (Trieste: Edizioni Lint), p. 325
Van Helden, A. 1989, (translator and commentator), Galileo Galilei: Sidereus Nuncius or The Sidereal Messenger (Chicago: University of Chicago Press)
Voelkel, J. R. 2001, The Composition of Kepler's Astronomia nova (Princeton: Princeton University Press)
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Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union
  • ISSN: 1743-9213
  • EISSN: 1743-9221
  • URL: /core/journals/proceedings-of-the-international-astronomical-union
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