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Terahertz Rotational Spectroscopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2006

T. F. Giesen
Affiliation:
I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne, Germany
S. Brünken
Affiliation:
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
M. Caris
Affiliation:
I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne, Germany
P. Neubauer-Guenther
Affiliation:
I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne, Germany
U. Fuchs
Affiliation:
I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne, Germany
G. W. Fuchs
Affiliation:
Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Postbus 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden, The Netherlands
F. Lewen
Affiliation:
I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne, Germany
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Abstract

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The detection of interstellar molecules relies on the precise knowledge of spectral line positions from laboratory measurements. Technical developments of recent years have led to an extension of the accessible spectral range towards shorter wavelengths. New telescopes like SOFIA, the HIFI instrument aboard the Herschel satellite, and ALMA will be used for astrophysical observations in the terahertz region. The Cologne group has developed precise spectrometers to study molecules of astrophysical importance under laboratory conditions and to obtain characteristic spectra for their possible detection in space. We present recent results on light hydrides, carbon-chain molecules and more complex species.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
2006 International Astronomical Union
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