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Effects of n-3 fatty acids on cartilage metabolism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2008

Clare L. Curtis
Affiliation:
Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3US, UK
Sarah G. Rees
Affiliation:
Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3US, UK
Joanna Cramp
Affiliation:
Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3US, UK
Carl R. Flannery*
Affiliation:
Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3US, UK
Clare E. Hughes
Affiliation:
Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3US, UK
Chris B. Little*
Affiliation:
Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3US, UK
Rhys Williams
Affiliation:
Department of Traumatic and Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW, UK
Chris Wilson
Affiliation:
Department of Traumatic and Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW, UK
Colin M. Dent
Affiliation:
Department of Traumatic and Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW, UK
John L. Harwood
Affiliation:
Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3US, UK
Bruce Caterson*
Affiliation:
Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3US, UK
*Corresponding
*Present address: Wyeth Research, Cambridge, MA 02140, USA.
Present address: Melbourne University Department of Paediatrics and Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville 3052, Victoria, Australia.
Present address: Melbourne University Department of Paediatrics and Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville 3052, Victoria, Australia.
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Abstract

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Although the clinical benefits of dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) has been recognised for a number of years, the molecular mechanisms by which particular PUFA affect metabolism of cells within the synovial joint tissues are not understood. This study set out to investigate how n-3 PUFA and other classes of fatty acids affect both degradative and inflammatory aspects of metabolism of articular cartilage chondrocytes using an in vitro model of cartilage degradation. Using well-established culture models, cartilage explants from normal bovine and human osteoarthritic cartilage were supplemented with either n-3 or n-6 PUFA, and cultures were subsequently treated with interleukin 1 to initiate catabolic processes that mimic cartilage degradation in arthritis. Results show that supplementation specifically with n-3 PUFA, but not n-6 PUFA, causes a decrease in both degradative and inflammatory aspects of chondrocyte metabolism, whilst having no effect on the normal tissue homeostasis. Collectively, our data provide evidence supporting dietary supplementation of n-3 PUFA, which in turn may have a beneficial effect of slowing and reducing inflammation in the pathogenesis of degenerative joint diseases in man.

Type
Joint National Nurses Nutritional Group and Parenteral and Enteral Group of the British Dietetic Association Symposium on ‘Working in Partnership’
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2002

References

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