Skip to main content
×
×
Home

The potential of food preservation to reduce food waste

  • Wayne Martindale (a1)
Abstract

While we state it seems unthinkable to throw away nearly a third of the food we produce, we still continue to overlook that we are all very much part of this problem because we all consume meals. The amount of food wasted clearly has an impact on our view of what we think a sustainable meal is and our research suggests food waste is a universal function that can help us determine the sustainability of diets. Achieving sustainability in food systems depends on the utilisation of both culinary skills and knowledge of how foods make meals. These are overlooked by the current food waste debate that is concerned with communicating the problem with food waste rather than solutions to it. We aim to change this oversight with the research presented here that demonstrates the need to consider the role of food preservation to reduce food waste and the requirement for new marketing terms associated with sustainability actions that can be used to stimulate changes in consumption behaviours. We have chosen frozen food to demonstrate this because our research has shown that the use of frozen foods results in 47 % less household food waste than fresh food categories. This has created a step-change in how we view food consumption and has stimulated consumer movements that act across different products and supply chains to enable the consumption of the sustainable meal.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The potential of food preservation to reduce food waste
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The potential of food preservation to reduce food waste
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The potential of food preservation to reduce food waste
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Corresponding author: W. Martindale, email w.martindale@shu.ac.uk
References
Hide All
1. Martindale, W (2014) Global Food Security and Supply. Oxford, UK: John Wiley & Sons.
2. Ambec, S & Ehlers, L (2014) Regulation via the polluter-pays principle. Econ J. (Epublication ahead of print version)
3. Garnett, T (2013) Food sustainability: problems, perspectives and solutions. Proc Nutr Soc 72, 2939.
4. O'Rourke, D (2014) The science of sustainable supply chains. Science 344, 11241127.
5. Kearney, J (2010) Food consumption trends and drivers. Philos Trans R Soc B: Biol Sci 365, 27932807.
6. De Boer, J, Schösler, H & Boersema, JJ (2013) Climate change and meat eating: an inconvenient couple? J Environ Psychol 33, 18.
7. Dormer, A, Finn, DP, Ward, P et al. (2013) Carbon footprint analysis in plastics manufacturing. J Clean Prod 51, 133141.
8. Martindale, W, Finnigan, T & Needham, L (2014) Current concepts and applied research in sustainable food processing. Sustainable Food Processing, pp. 938 [Tiwari, BK, Norton, T and Holden, NM, editors]. Oxford, UK: John Wiley & Sons.
9. Macdiarmid, JI (2013) Is a healthy diet an environmentally sustainable diet? Proc Nutr Soc 72, 1320.
10. De Boer, J, Schösler, H & Aiking, H (2014) ‘Meatless days’ or ‘less but better’? Exploring strategies to adapt Western meat consumption to health and sustainability challenges. Appetite 76, 120128.
11. Google Trends. https://www.google.co.uk/trends/ (accessed April 2016).
12. Leslie, WS, Eunson, J, Murray, L et al. (2014) What, not just salad and veg? Consumer testing of the eatwell week. Public Health Nutr 17, 16401646.
13. Noakes, M & Clifton, P (2013) The CSIRO Total Wellbeing Diet. UK: Penguin.
14. Vlassopoulos, A, Masset, G, Charles, VR et al. (2016) A nutrient profiling system for the (re)formulation of a global food and beverage portfolio. To describe the Nestlé Nutritional Profiling System (NNPS) developed to guide the reformulation of Nestlé products, and the results of its application in the USA and France. Eur J Nutr 55, 118.
15. Tilman, D & Clark, M (2014) Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health. Nature 515, 518522.
16. Food and Agriculture Organization (2013) Food Wastage Footprint, Summary Report; epublication. http://www.fao.org/docrep/018/i3347e/i3347e.pdf (accessed December 2015).
17. Jimenez-Gonzalez, C, Ponder, CS, Broxterman, QB et al. (2011) Using the right green yardstick: why process mass intensity is used in the pharmaceutical industry to drive more sustainable processes. Org Process Res Dev 15, 912917.
18. Counting the Cost of Food Waste: EU Food Waste Prevention (2014) House of Lords HL 154 European Union Committee 10th Report of Session 2013–14; available at http://www.parliament.uk/documents/lords-committees/eu-sub-com-d/food-waste-prevention/154.pdf (accessed December 2015).
19. Martindale, W (2014) Using consumer surveys to determine food sustainability. Brit Food J 116, 11941204.
20. California Walnut Board (2015) http://www.walnuts.org/health-and-walnuts/resources/brochures/ (accessed December 2015).
21. Bragg, R, Wood, C, Barton, J et al. (2013) Measuring connection to nature in children aged 8–12: a robust methodology for the RSPB; Epublication https://www.rspb.org.uk/Images/methodology-report_tcm9-354606.pdf (accessed December 2015).
22. Bailly, N, Maitre, I, Amanda, M et al. (2012) The Dutch eating behaviour questionnaire (DEBQ). Assessment of eating behaviour in an aging French population. Appetite 59, 853858.
23. Forever Food Together (2014) The Green Captain logo and Forever Food Together. http://www.birdseye.co.uk/ForeverFoodTogether (accessed November 2015).
24.The history of the WI at https://www.thewi.org.uk/centenary/the-history-of-the-wi (accessed December 2015).
25. Defra (2014) Food Statistics Pocketbook 2014; epublication https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/food-statistics-pocketbook (accessed October 2015).
26. Bush, SR, Toonen, H, Oosterveer, P et al. (2013) The ‘devils triangle’ of MSC certification: balancing credibility, accessibility and continuous improvement. Mar Policy 37, 288293.
27. Proulx, R, Massicotte, P & Pepino, M (2014) Googling trends in conservation biology. Conserv Biol 28, 4451.
28. Hornibrook, S, May, C & Fearne, A (2013) Sustainable development and the consumer: exploring the role of carbon labelling in retail supply chains. Bus Strateg Environ 24, 266276.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
  • ISSN: 0029-6651
  • EISSN: 1475-2719
  • URL: /core/journals/proceedings-of-the-nutrition-society
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed