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Comparative Reasoning in the Undergraduate Classroom

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 September 2009

George Gavrilis
Affiliation:
University of Texas-Austin
Mona El-Ghobashy
Affiliation:
Barnard College

Abstract

One of the greatest challenges we face as political scientists is to teach undergraduates how to think comparatively. This article proposes a number of practical, easily adaptable exercises that many of us can incorporate in our teaching to turn curious undergraduates into smart social scientists who think comparatively about the world.

Type
The Teacher
Copyright
Copyright © The American Political Science Association 2009

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