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Making DA-RT a Reality

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 December 2013

Thomas M. Carsey*
Affiliation:
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Extract

Calls for greater data access and research transparency have emerged on many fronts within professional social science. For example, the American Political Science Association (APSA) recently adopted new guidelines for data access and research transparency. APSA has also appointed the Data Access and Research Transparency (DA-RT) ad hoc committee to continue exploring these issues. DA-RT sponsored this symposium. In addition, funding agencies like the National Institutes for Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) have expanded requirements for data management and data distribution. These pressures present challenges to researchers, but they also present opportunities.

Type
Symposium: Openness in Political Science
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2014 

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References

Gherghina, Sergiu, and Katsanidou, Alexia. 2013. “Data Availability in Political Science Journals.” European Political Science March: doi:10.1057/eps.2013.8. Google Scholar
Pienta, Amy M., Alter, George C., and Lyle, Jared A.. 2010. “The Enduring Value of Social Science Research: The Use and Reuse of Primary Research Data.” http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/78307.Google Scholar
Piwowar, Heather A., Day, Roger S., and Fridsma, Douglas B.. 2007. “Sharing Detailed Research Data is Associated with Increased Citation Rate.” PLoS ONE 2 (3): doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000308. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vision, Todd J. 2010. “Open Data and The Social Contract of Scientific Publishing.” Bio-Science 60 (5): 330331.Google Scholar
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Making DA-RT a Reality
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