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Policing Us Sick: The Health of Latinos in an Era of Heightened Deportations and Racialized Policing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 April 2018

Vanessa Cruz Nichols
Affiliation:
Indiana University
Alana M. W. LeBrón
Affiliation:
University of California, Irvine
Francisco I. Pedraza
Affiliation:
University of California, Riverside

Abstract

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Type
Symposium: Stepping Back or Stepping Out? Latinos, Immigration, and the 2016 Presidential Election
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2018 

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References

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Supplementary material: PDF

Nichols et al. supplementary material

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