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Ranking Political Science Journals: Reputational and Citational Approaches

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 October 2007

Micheal W. Giles
Affiliation:
Emory University
James C. Garand
Affiliation:
Louisiana State University

Extract

Academic journals play a key role in the dissemination of scholarly knowledge in the social sciences. Hence, publication in journals is critical evidence of scholarly performance for both individuals and the departments that they populate. While in the best of worlds each scholar's performance would be evaluated based on a close reading of his/her published journal articles, in the actual practices of hiring, tenure and promotion review, and departmental evaluations this ideal is often honored only in the breach. Instead, evaluators commonly base their judgments of the importance and quality of published articles, at least in part, on the journals in which they appear. The higher the status accorded a journal, the greater the weight attached to publications appearing in it.

Type
THE PROFESSION
Copyright
© 2007 The American Political Science Association

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