Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-zdfhw Total loading time: 2.076 Render date: 2022-08-10T03:13:05.558Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Reflections on Mentoring: Black Women and the Academy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2004

Julia S. Jordan-Zachery
Affiliation:
Howard University

Extract

Mentoring is generally defined as a relationship involving guiding, nurturing, and teaching (both formally and informally) between individuals with differing degrees of experience (Adams 1998; Colwell 1998; Rowley 1999). The mentoring process, in and outside the walls of academia, is often cited as a key ingredient in the development of a successful career. However, for many Black women in academia their ability to benefit from mentoring relationships is particularly limited. As part of my involvement in the APSA Mentoring Task Force, I am exploring the concept of mentoring among Black women. I focus on Black women for several reasons. First, I am a member of this group and have a particular interest in exploring the nuances of mentoring. My identification with this group has made me privy to a number of discussions on mentoring, both positive and negative. Second, Black women represent 1.21% of the 4,126 tenure track professors, of which only nine are full professors (Kelly 2002, 22). The large majority of African Americans in the profession are concentrated among the ranks of associate (18 out of 1,230) and assistant professors (20 out of 1,038). The limited number Black women in the profession can result in a condition in which potential mentors are unavailable to junior scholars, or there are few opportunities to establish relationships. My purpose is not to focus on the problems of Black women in academia, instead it is to bring attention to a major issue, mentoring, which can enhance or limit the success of this group in the discipline. In this article, I interview five Black women at various stages in their careers. The interviewees include an undergraduate student, a graduate student (ABD), an assistant professor, an associate professor, and a retired professor. The goal of this article is to reveal the special demands of mentoring on this small minority in the discipline. However, much of the information revealed is useful for anyone interested in the mentoring process.

Type
The Profession
Copyright
© 2004 by the American Political Science Association

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Adams H. G. 1998. The Mentorship Briefing Guide: Handbook for Establishing and Implementing a Mentoring Program. Notre Dame, IN: GEM Consortium.
Alfred M. V. 1995. Outsiders-Within: The Professional Development History of Black Tenured Female Faculty in the White Research Academy. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation. University of Texas at Austin.
Benjamin L., ed. 1997. Black Women in the Academy: Promises and Perils. Gainesville: University Press of Florida.
Blackwell J. E. 1988. “Faculty Issues: Impact on Minorities.” The Review of Higher Education 11 (4): 417434.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Colwell S. 1998. “Mentoring, Socialization and the Mentor/Protégé Relationship.” Teaching in Higher Education 3 (3): 313325.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crenshaw K. 2000. “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics.” In The Black Feminist Reader, eds. Joy James and T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 208238.
Gregory S. 1995. Black Women in the Academy: The Secrets to Success and Achievement. New York: University Press of America.
Hooks b. 1989. Talking Back: Thinking Feminist, Thinking Black. Boston: South End Press.
Johnsrud L. K. 1993. “Women and Minority Faculty Experiences: Defining and Responding to Diverse Realities.” In Building a Diverse Faculty, New Directions for Teaching and Learning, eds. J. Gainen and R. Boice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 316.
Kelly M. J. 2002. APSA Survey of Political Science Departments: Report August 2002. Washington, D.C.: American Political Science Association.
Mabokela R. O., and A. L. Green. 2001. Sisters of the Academy. Sterling, VA: Stylus.
Mims G. L., ed. 1981. The Minority Administrator in Higher Education. Cambridge: Schenkman Publishing Co.
Rowley J. B. 1999. “The Good Mentor.” Educational Leadership 56 (8): 2022.Google Scholar
Smith D., L. E. Wolf, and B. E. Busenberg. 1996. “Achieving Faculty Diversity: Debunking the Myths.”Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities. ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 348 785.
Tack M. W., and C. L. Patitu. 1992. “Faculty Job Satisfaction: Women and Minorities in Peril.” ERIC Digest, 4, 9296.Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Reflections on Mentoring: Black Women and the Academy
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Reflections on Mentoring: Black Women and the Academy
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Reflections on Mentoring: Black Women and the Academy
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *