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Social Network Analysis in the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 January 2011

Arie Perliger
Affiliation:
U.S. Military Academy at West Point
Ami Pedahzur
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Austin

Extract

The academic community studying terrorism has changed dramatically in the past decade. From a research area that was investigated by a small number of political scientists and sociologists and employed mainly descriptive and qualitative studies that resulted in limited theoretical progress (Schmid and Jongman 1988; Crenshaw 2000), it has in a short time become one of the more vibrant and rapidly developing academic realms in the scholarly world today. Scholars from different branches of the social sciences have engaged in an effort to unravel this phenomenon, introducing new theoretical outlooks, conceptualizations, and methods.

Type
Symposium
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2011

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