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What Might Bring Regular Order Back to the House?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 April 2010

Matthew Green
Affiliation:
The Catholic University of America
Daniel Burns
Affiliation:
The Catholic University of America

Extract

It is not hard to find critics of how the U.S. Congress operates today. Two of the most prominent, Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein, have bemoaned in particular Congress's failure to follow “regular order,” which in their 2006 book The Broken Branch they describe as a legislative process that incorporates “discussion, debate, negotiation, and compromise” (Mann and Ornstein 2006, 170).

Type
Symposium
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2010

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