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Academic Censorship in China: The Case of The China Quarterly

  • Mathew Y. H. Wong (a1) and Ying-ho Kwong (a2)
Abstract

The recent censorship requests made by Chinese authorities to Western academic publishers have sent shockwaves throughout the academic world. This article examines the high-profile The China Quarterly incident as a case in point. Because the censorship is expected to be followed by similar demands to other publications, it is important for the academic community to explore the logic behind it. This research article provides a preliminary analysis of publications on the censorship list and compares them to uncensored articles on similar themes. This exercise allows us to draw important insights. Theoretically, this article makes an original contribution by going beyond the censorship within to outside China. Empirically, it offers a comprehensive analysis of what China wants to censor and the context for its actions.

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References
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Feng, Emily. 2017. “Chinese Universities Accused of Ideological Weakness.” Financial Times, June 19. Available at www.ft.com/content/88191d36-54b4-11e7-9fed-c19e2700005f.
Kwong, Kim-ming, and Yu, Hong. 2013. “Identity Politics.” In Hong Kong under Chinese Rule: Economic Integration and Political Gridlock, ed. Zheng, Yongnian and Yew, Chiew Ping, 125–49. Singapore: World Scientific.
Lau, Mimi, and Mai, Jun. 2017. “Cambridge University Press Pulls Sensitive Journal Articles in China at the Request of Beijing.” South China Morning Post, April 19. Available at www.scmp.com/news/china/policies-politics/article/2107419/cambridge-university-press-pulls-sensitive-journal.
Lorentzen, Peter. 2013. “China’s Strategic Censorship.” American Journal of Political Science 58 (2): 402–14.
Qiang, Xiao. 2011. “The Battle for the Chinese Internet.” Journal of Democracy 22 (2): 4761.
Ruwitch, John. 2017. “Blunt Instrument? What a List of Banned Articles Says about Censors.” Reuters, August 23. Available at https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-china-censorship-articles/blunt-instrument-what-a-list-of-banned-articles-says-about-chinas-censors-idUKKCN1B30WQ.
Smith, Nicola. 2017. “Taiwan Is Desperate for Fee-Paying, Mainland Chinese Students. That Could Be Bad for Academic Freedom.” Time, March 10. Available at http://time.com/4697784/tainwan-universities-mainland-china-academic-freedom.
Yang, Fan. 2016. “Rethinking China’s Internet Censorship: The Practice of Recoding and the Politics of Visibility.” New Media & Society 18 (7): 1364–81.
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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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