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Rock and Roll Will Never Die: Using Music to Engage Students in the Study of Political Science

  • Christopher Soper (a1)
Abstract
Abstract

Popular music is ubiquitous in the lives of our students, music is used by politicians at virtually every one of their campaign events, and musicians are increasingly active in politics, but music has never been considered as a pedagogical tool in teaching political science classes. This article describes the use of music in an introduction to American politics class. I argue that playing music in class can increase student interest, reinforce important concepts, and actively engage the students in the learning process. Finally, using popular culture connects meaningfully with the way that many of our undergraduate students are experiencing politics.

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References
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Beavers Staci L. 2002. “The West Wing as a Pedagogical Tool.” PS: Political Science and Politics 35 (2): 213–16.
Bellver Catherine G. 2008. “Music as a Hook in the Literature Classroom.” Hispania 91 (4): 887–96.
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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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