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Simulating the Bargaining Model of War

  • Kyle Haynes (a1)
Abstract
ABSTRACT

This article outlines a classroom simulation for teaching the bargaining model of war. This model has become one of the most important theories of international conflict, but the technical notation often used to illustrate it is troublesome for some students. I describe a simple card game that can be integrated into a broader strategy for conveying the bargaining model’s core insights. I also highlight ways in which the game can be modified to focus on different aspects of the model’s logic.

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References
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Asal Victor. 2005. “Playing Games with International Relations.” International Studies Perspectives 6 (3): 359–73.
Brynen Rex. 2010. “(Ending) Civil War in the Classroom: A Peacebuilding Simulation.” PS: Political Science and Politics 43 (1): 145–9.
Fearon James D. 1995. “Rationalist Explanations for War.” International Organization 49 (3): 379414.
Frederking Brian. 2005. “Simulations and Student Learning.” Journal of Political Science Education 1 (3): 385–93.
Frieden Jeffrey A., Lake David A., and Schultz Kenneth A.. 2012. World Politics: Interests, Interactions, and Institutions. 2nd edition. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.
Powell Robert. 2006. “War as a Commitment Problem.” International Organization 60 (1): 169203.
Reiter Dan. 2003. “Exploring the Bargaining Model of War.” Perspectives on Politics 1 (1): 2743.
Shellman Stephen, and Turan Kursad. 2006. “Do Simulations Enhance Student Learning? An Empirical Evaluation of an IR Simulation.” Journal of Political Science Education 2 (1): 1932.
Slantchev Branislav, and Tarar Ahmer. 2011. “Mutual Optimism as a Rationalist Explanation of War.” American Journal of Political Science 55 (1): 135–48.
Wheeler Sarah M. 2006. “Role-Playing Games and Simulations for International Issues Courses.” Journal of Political Science Education 2 (3): 331–47.
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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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