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Adherence to substitute opioid prescribing: survey of inner-London drug services

  • John Dunn (a1), Michael Haskew (a2) and Anshuman Pant (a3)
Abstract
Aims and Method

To investigate non-adherence to substitute opioid treatment, using a cross-sectional study design, with 630 patients from three London community drug services. Adherence was measured as the number of doses collected from the pharmacy as a proportion of the total number of doses stipulated on the prescription during a 28-day period and was further investigated through laboratory urine drug screens.

Results

Overall, 30.5% (n= 191) of individuals failed to pick up at least one dose of medication from the pharmacy over 1 month, but only 1.6% (n= 10) missed 50% or more of their doses. Non-adherence was associated with supervised consumption, more frequent pick-up, shorter duration of treatment, younger age, a lower dose of methadone and a recent urinalysis result positive for opiates.

Clinical Implications

Treatment services need to monitor levels of adherence to treatment and develop strategies to improve it so that treatment can be optimised effectively.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Adherence to substitute opioid prescribing: survey of inner-London drug services

  • John Dunn (a1), Michael Haskew (a2) and Anshuman Pant (a3)
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