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Aetiology of depression and schizophrenia: current views of British psychiatrists

  • Dave Baillie (a1), Rosemarie McCabe (a2) and Stefan Priebe (a3)
Abstract
Aims and Method

A postal survey assessed current views of a random sample of 154 British psychiatrists on aetiological factors in depression and schizophrenia.

Results

Genetics, biochemical abnormalities and substance misuse were considered important factors in both illnesses. Beyond that, psychiatrists varied widely in their views. Depression was viewed as a more multifactorial condition with psychological/social factors more important, whereas biological factors were considered more important in schizophrenia. Aetiological factors were thought to vary more in depression than in schizophrenia and discussing them was seen as more important in patients with depression.

Clinical Implications

Psychiatrists' attitudes are likely to influence treatment. Patients may encounter different views depending on their illness and on the particular psychiatrist's views.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Aetiology of depression and schizophrenia: current views of British psychiatrists

  • Dave Baillie (a1), Rosemarie McCabe (a2) and Stefan Priebe (a3)
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