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Are psychiatrists sexist? a study of bias in the assessment of psychiatric emergencies

  • Ion Hall (a1) and Martin Deahl (a2)
Abstract

In order to investigate bias in history taking among psychiatric trainees, a retrospective study of case-notes was undertaken in an emergency psychiatric clinic in a teaching district. Two hundred and twenty-seven consecutive new patient assessments were assessed for quality of alcohol, substance use and forensic histories. Trainees were more likely to take alcohol, substance use and forensic histories from men, and more likely to take substance use histories from younger patients. It is concluded that trainees make sexist and ageist assumptions when they assess patients. There is a need for the education of doctors in this area.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Are psychiatrists sexist? a study of bias in the assessment of psychiatric emergencies

  • Ion Hall (a1) and Martin Deahl (a2)
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