Skip to main content
×
×
Home

The demand for psychiatric services as a result of the Gulf war

  • Jacqueline M. Atkinson (a1)
Extract

Despite the brevity of the Gulf war, there is still the strong possibility that it will leave long-term problems for psychiatric services within the NHS. The low incidence of acute psychiatric problems in the Falklands conflict does not obviate long-term problems. Surgeon-Commander O'Connell of the Royal Navy, reported informally in the newspapers (Guardian, 7 May 1990) that up to 30% of the 28,000 Falklands veterans are still suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Hughes (1990), medical officer with 2nd Paratroop Regiment at Goose Green, described his realisation that he had PTSD, his subsequent treatment by the NHS and transfer to a military hospital. The Royal Navy still has a counselling service, set up in 1987, but it is clear that military services cannot deal with all the current problems, let alone those to come. The advice of the Ministry of Defence is that the initial onus to recognise a problem lies with the family and that sufferers should seek treatment through their GP.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The demand for psychiatric services as a result of the Gulf war
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The demand for psychiatric services as a result of the Gulf war
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The demand for psychiatric services as a result of the Gulf war
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
Belenky, G., Noy, S. & Solomon, Z. (1987) Battle stress, morale cohesion, combat effectiveness, heroism and psychiatric casualties: the Israeli experience. In Contemporary Studies in Combat Psychiatry (ed. Belenky, G.) Westport, Conn.: Greenwood.
Blank, A. S. Jr. (1982) Apocalypse terminable and interminable: operation outreach for Vietnam veterans. Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 33, 913918.
Brooking, J. I. (1983) Potential psychological problems of Army Medical Service personnel in combat with particular reference to the Territorial Army. Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps, 129, 146153.
Davidson, J., Swartz, M., Stork, M., Kristinan, R. R. & Hammett, E. (1985) A diagnostic and family study of post-traumatic stress disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 142, 9093.
Dewane, C. J. (1984) Post-traumatic stress disorder in medical personnel in Vietnam. Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 35, 12321234.
Dudasik, S. W. (1980) Victimization in natural disaster. Disasters, 4, 127128.
Fullerton, C. S. & Ursano, R. J. (1990) Behavioural and psychological responses to chemical and biological warfare. Military Medicine, 155, 5459.
Goderez, B. I. (1987) The survivor syndrome. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 5, 96113.
Hughes, S. (1990) Inside madness. British Medical Journal, 301, 14671468.
Inbar, D., Solomon, Z., Aviram, V., Spiro, S. & Kotler, M. (1989) Officer's attitudes toward combat stress reaction: Responsibility, treatment, return to duty and personal distance. Military Medicine, 154, 480487.
Keane, T. M., Scott, W. O., Chavoya, G. A., Lamparski, D. M. & Fairbank, J. H. (1985) Social support in Vietnam veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder: a comparative analysis. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 53, 95102.
Rahe, R. H. (1988) Acute vs. chronic psychological reactions to combat. Military Medicine, 153, 365372.
Raphael, B. (1986) When Disaster Strikes. London: Hutchinson.
Romo, J. M. & Schneider, R. J. (1982) Disaster, psychiatric casualties and implementation for future war. Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps, 128, 9399.
Rosser, R. (1989) The King's Cross disaster. Paper presented at Post Incident Stress Disorder, Hamilton. Nov.
Small, R. H. (1984) Practical training in the management of psychiatric combat casualties. Military Medicine, 149, 276279.
Solomon, Z. & Benbenishty, R. (1986) The role of proximity, immediacy and expectancy in front-line treatment of combat stress reaction among Israelis in the Lebanon war. American Journal of Psychiatry, 143, 613617.
Solomon, Z., Mikulincer, M., Jakob, B. R. (1987) Exposure to recurrent combat stress: combat stress reactions among Israeli soldiers in the 1982 Lebanon war. Psychological Medicine, 17, 433440.
Sutner, P. B., Bugg, F. & Allain, A. (1990) Person and situational correlates of post-traumatic stress disorder among POW survivors. Psychological Reports, 66, 912914.
Sudak, H. S., Corradi, R. B., Martin, R. S. & Gold, F. S. (1984) Antecedent personality factors and the post-Vietnam syndrome: case reports. Military Medicine, 149, 550554.
Taylor, A. J. W. & Fraser, A. G. (1981) Psychological Sequelae of Operation Overdue following the DC-10 Air-crash in Antarctica. Victoria University of Wellington (N.Z.) Publications in Psychology, No. 27.
Ursano, R. J., Holloway, H. C., Jones, D. R., Rodriguez, A. R. & Belenky, G. L. (1989) Psychiatric care in the military community; family and military stressors. Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 40, 12841289.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 4 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 22nd July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

The demand for psychiatric services as a result of the Gulf war

  • Jacqueline M. Atkinson (a1)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *