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Drug-related movement disorders: training experiences of psychiatrists

  • Kompancariel Kuruvilla (a1), Jose Antonio Sedano-Ruiz (a2) and Ann Ley (a3)
Abstract
Aims and Method

A questionnaire was sent by post to 185 psychiatrists in Devon and Cornwall to investigate training in the assessment and management of drug-related movement disorders and current training needs.

Results

Responses were obtained from 143 psychiatrists (77%). Formal training was reported by 67 out of 140 (48%). Only 26 out of 142 (18%) had received formal training in the use of rating scales, which were rarely used. The mean level of satisfaction with training received was below the mid-point on a 5-point scale at 2.76 (s.d.=1.23). Mean levels of confidence in the assessment and management of drug-related movement disorders were just above mid-point at 3.25 (s.d.=1.04) and 3.16 (s.d.=0.99) respectively. Specific training was thought to be necessary by 135 out of 141 psychiatrists (96%) and there were high levels of interest in further training, particularly from those below consultant grade.

Clinical Implications

Drug-related movement disorders affect patients' adherence to medication and their quality of life. Psychiatrists need more structured clinical training in assessing and managing these disorders in order to provide the best clinical care.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Drug-related movement disorders: training experiences of psychiatrists

  • Kompancariel Kuruvilla (a1), Jose Antonio Sedano-Ruiz (a2) and Ann Ley (a3)
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