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Effects of a crisis resolution and home treatment team on in-patient admissions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Krishma Jethwa
Affiliation:
South Hams Community Mental Health Trust, 8 Fore Street, Ivybridge, Devon PL21 9AB, email: dr.k.jethwa@doctors.org.uk
Nuwan Galappathie
Affiliation:
Langdon Hospital, Dawlish, Devon
Paul Hewson
Affiliation:
School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, Devon
Corresponding
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Abstract

Aims and Method

To evaluate the effects of a crisis resolution and home-based treatment team upon in-patient admission rates. We collected data for 2 years prior and 1 year post-implementation of such a service in Leeds. The chosen time frame allowed the new service to settle in and controlled for seasonal variations.

Results

There were 4353 admissions during the period of the study, with 3325 in the 2 years prior to the service and 1028 in the year after. Generalised linear analysis found a 37.5% reduction in monthly admissions after the introduction of the team (P < 0.0001).

Clinical Implications

This study shows that in everyday clinical practice crisis resolution and home treatment teams lead to a sustained reduction in in-patient admission rates.

Type
Original papers
Creative Commons
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2007

References

Brimblecombe, N. (2001) Acute Mental Health Care in the Community: Intensive Home Treatment. Whurr Books.Google Scholar
Department of Health (2001) The Mental Health Policy Implementation Guidelines. Department of Health.Google Scholar
Johnson, S., Nolan, F., Pilling, S., et al (2005a) Randomised controlled trial of acute mental health care by a crisis resolution team: the north Islington crisis study. BMJ, 331, 599602.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, S., Nolan, F., Hoult, J., et al (2005b) Outcomes of crises before and after introduction of a crisis resolution team. British Journal of Psychiatry, 187, 6875.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Joy, C. B., Adams, C. E. & Rice, K. (2004) Crisis intervention for people with severe mental illnesses. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, issue 4. Update Software.Google Scholar
Weisman, G. K. (1989) Crisis intervention. In A Clinical Guide for the Treatment of Schizophrenia (ed. Bellack, A. S.), pp. 101134. Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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