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Nature and extent of dental pathology and complications arising in patients receiving ECT

  • Nita Beli (a1) and Peter Bentham (a2)
Abstract

This study aimed to describe the prevalence of dental pathology in patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy and to prospectively determine the incidence of dental complications arising during treatment. Of 30 subjects, 93% complained of a dry mouth and 83% were taking drugs with anticholinergic properties. A third wore dentures and the dentate population had a mean of 15 decayed, missing or filled teeth. Oral hygiene and periodontal condition was poor with one-third requiring scaling and 30% complex periodontal treatment. Temporomandibular pain followed 44% of treatments, and minor buccal lesions occurred in 22%. Greater emphasis must be placed on dental care, and guidelines are suggested to improve practice.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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References
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Ainamo, J., Barnes, D., Beagrie, G., et al (1982) Development of the World Health Organization community peridontal index of treatment needs. International Dental Journal, 32, 281291.
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Minneman, S. A. (1995) A history of oral protection for the ECT patient: past, present and future. Convulsive Therapy, 11, 94103.
Royal College of Psychiatrists (1995) The ECT Handbook . The Second Report of the Royal College of Psychiatrists' Special Committee on ECT (Council Report CR39). London: Royal College of Psychiatrists.
Slawson, P. (1989) Psychiatric malpractice and ECT: a review of national loss experience. Convulsive Therapy, 5, 126130. Weiner, R. D. & McCall, W. V. (1992) Dental consultation in ECT. Convulsive Therapy, 8, 146.
World Health Organization (1992) The Tenth Revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD–10). WHO: Geneva.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Nature and extent of dental pathology and complications arising in patients receiving ECT

  • Nita Beli (a1) and Peter Bentham (a2)
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