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Organising a mock OSCE for the MRCPsych Part I examination

  • Iain Pryde (a1), Amrit Sachar (a2), Stephanie Young (a3), Amanda Hukin (a4), Teifion Davies (a5) and Ranga Rao (a6)...
Abstract
Aims and Method

With the changes introduced recently to the Part I clinical examination, trainers will be expected to modify MRCPsych course teaching accordingly. The aim of this paper is to describe the procedure for organising a mock objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) for MRCPsych trainees.

Results

Prior to the introduction of the new OSCE, we organised an authentic mock OSCE for our trainees. We have now run three consecutive mock examinations which have been successfully evaluated.

Clinical Implications

A well-organised mock OSCE requires significant investment in terms of planning, resources and enthusiasm, but can have a potentially beneficial impact on and preparation for the real OSCE and training in general.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Hodges, B., Regehr, G., Mcnaughton, N., et al (1999) OSCE checklists do not capture increasing levels of experience. Academic Medicine, 74, 11291134.
Naeem, A., Rutherford, J. & Kenn, C. (2004) The MRCPsych OSCE workshop: a new game to play? Psychiatric Bulletin, 28, 6265.
Tyrer, S. & Oyebode, F. (2004) Why does the MRCPsych examination need to change? British Journal of Psychiatry, 184, 197199.
Wallace, J., Rao, R. & Haslam, R. (2002) Simulated patients and objective structured clinical examinations: a review of their use in medical education. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 8, 342348.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Organising a mock OSCE for the MRCPsych Part I examination

  • Iain Pryde (a1), Amrit Sachar (a2), Stephanie Young (a3), Amanda Hukin (a4), Teifion Davies (a5) and Ranga Rao (a6)...
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eLetters

Organising a mock MRCPsych OSCE: time for SHOs to act?

Asim Naeem, Specialist Registrar in Psychiatry
09 March 2005

Pryde et al (Psychiatric Bulletin, February 2005, 29, 67-70) providedan excellent practical guide on how to organise a regional mock MRCPsych OSCE, acknowledging its cost implications. To minimise the financial overheads, we find it helpful to use post-Part I SHOs (rather than hiring professional actors) to role-play the patients. Our evaluations have found them to be accurate in simulating patient symptoms, and responding consistently to 'non-scripted' questions from the candidates. As most of them will be familiar with the OSCE format, they can contribute to the writing of the stations (by ensuring that they are pitched at the correct level), and provide helpful feedback to candidates on additional aspects of OSCE technique. Unlike most examiners, they will have previously been through the exam as candidates. Most of our SHOs have also reported that their own skills of empathy are enhanced by acting in the patient or carerrole, thereby fulfilling one of the six interactive components of 'patient-centred psychiatry' (Bhugra & Holsgrove, 2005).

Whilst there can be a risk of some station details being 'leaked' to the candidates by their peers, we have found that this is generally not the case. In the current climate of financial restrictions on Trusts, maybe it is time for SHOs to 'act'? They may even find the experience fun, supporting Sir John Gielgud's view that "being another character is more interesting than being yourself!"

REFERENCE:

BHUGRA D & HOLSGROVE G (2005). Patient-centred psychiatry. Psychiatric Bulletin, 29, 49-52.
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Conflict of interest: None Declared

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