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Recruitment into psychiatry: views of consultants in Scotland

  • Tom M. Brown (a1), Karen Addie (a2) and John M. Eagles (a3)
Abstract
AIMS AND METHOD

By use of a postal survey we sought to determine attitudes and beliefs about recruitment to psychiatry. Members of the Scottish Division of the Royal College of Psychiatrists were asked to complete a questionnaire asking their views on the importance of various factors in relation to recruitment (n=387).

RESULTS

Response rates were low from non-consultants and we focused on the views of the 212 consultants (55%) who responded. The perceived low status of psychiatry among other doctors and the belief that individuals with psychiatric disorders are difficult to deal with emerged as the two most important factors seen to affect recruitment. Improving undergraduate teaching in psychiatry was deemed important in enhancing recruitment.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

Dealing with stigma, within and out with the profession, and improving undergraduate exposure to psychiatry may be important in recruiting doctors to psychiatry.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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