Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Service innovations: a depersonalisation research unit progress report

  • M. L. Phillips (a1), M. Sierra (a1), E. Hunter (a1), M. V. Lambert (a1), N. Medford (a1), C. Senior (a1) and A. S. David (a1)...
Extract

Depersonalisation was described clinically over 100 years ago, yet there has been little research into this interesting but distressing psychiatric disorder. The symptom of depersonalisation can occur alone or in the context of other psychiatric and neurological illnesses and is characterised by the experience of detachment from one's senses and the outside environment, and may be present for several years without remission. Two years after the establishment of the depersonalisation research unit at the Maudsley Hospital, London, we report on current neurobiological and clinical research findings, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, psychophysiology and neuroendocrinology and progress regarding the development of effective treatments.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Service innovations: a depersonalisation research unit progress report
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Service innovations: a depersonalisation research unit progress report
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Service innovations: a depersonalisation research unit progress report
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
Ackner, B. (1954) Depersonalisation. I Aetiology and phenomenology. Journal of Mental Science, 100, 838853.
American Psychiatric Association (1994) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–IV). Washington DC: American Psychiatric Association.
Anand, A., Charney, D. S., Oren, D. A., et al (2000) Attenuation of the neuropsychiatric effects of ketamine with lamotrigine: support for hyperglutamatergic effects of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists. Archives of General Psychiatry, 57, 270276.
Brauer, R., Harrow, M. & Tucker, G. J. (1970) Depersonalisation phenomena in psychiatric patients. British Journal of Psychiatry, 117, 509515.
Dugas, L. (1898) Un cas de dépersonnalisation. Introduced and translated by Sierra, M. and Berrios, G. E. (1996) History of Psychiatry, vii, 451461.
Hollander, E., Liebowitz, M. R., Decaria, C., et al (1990) Treatment of depersonalisation with serotonin reuptake blockers. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 10, 200203.
Lader, M. H. (1975) The Psychophysiology of Mental Illness. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
Lambert, M. V., Senior, C., Phillips, M. L., et al (2001a) Depersonalisation in cyberspace. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease (in press).
Lambert, M. V., Fewtrell, W. D., Phillips, M. L., et al (2001b) Primary and secondary depersonalisation disorder: a psychometric study. Journal of Affective Disorders (in press).
Mayer-Gross, W. (1935) On depersonalisation. British Journal of Medicine and Psychology, XV(2), 103126.
Ross, C. A. (1991) Epidemiology of multiple personality disorder and dissociation. In Multiple Personality Disorder (ed Loewenstein, R. J.), pp. 503517. Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders Company.
Senior, C., Phillips, M. & David, A. S. (1997) Psychiatry and the WWW: some implications. Psychiatric Bulletin, 21, 775778.
Shorvon, H. J. (1946) The depersonalisation syndrome. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine, XXXIX, 779792.
Sierra, M. & Berrios, G. E. (1998) Depersonalisation: neurobiological perspectives. Biological Psychiatry, 44, 898908.
Sierra, M. & Berrios, G. E. (2000) The Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale: a new instrument for the measurement of depersonalisation. Psychiatry Research, 93, 153164.
Simeon, D., Gross, S., Guralnik, O., et al (1997) Feeling unreal: 30 cases of DSM–III–R depersonalisation disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 154, 11071113.
Simeon, D., Gross, S., & Guralnik, O., et al (1998a) The detection and measurement of depersonalisation disorder. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 186, 536542.
Simeon, D., Stein, D. J. & Hollander, E. (1998b) Treatment of depersonalisation disorder with clomipramine. Biological Psychiatry, 44, 302303.
Steinberg, M., Cicchetti, D., Buchanan, J., et al (1993) Clinical assessment of dissociative symptoms and disorders: the structural clinical interview for DSM–IV dissociative disorders (SCID–D). Dissociation, 6, 315.
Wells, A., White, J. & Carter, K. (1997) Attention training: effects on anxiety and beliefs in panic and social phobia. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, 4, 226232.
Yehuda, R. (1998) Psychoneuroendocrinology of posttraumatic stress disorder. Psychiatric Clinic of North America, 21, 359379.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 1
Total number of PDF views: 3 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 99 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 20th July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Service innovations: a depersonalisation research unit progress report

  • M. L. Phillips (a1), M. Sierra (a1), E. Hunter (a1), M. V. Lambert (a1), N. Medford (a1), C. Senior (a1) and A. S. David (a1)...
Submit a response

eLetters

EMDR & Hypnosis

Antoinette T Geoghegan, Consultant Child Pschiatrist;Child Psychotherapist
12 May 2005

Dear Dr Phillips et al,

I wonder if EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) may help in depersonalisation as it has been found to be helpful in trauma, and it seems there is a trauma component to depersonalisation. I have usedEMDR successfully with a child and an adolescent who had PTSD.

I have no experience of hypnosis but similarly I wonder if this couldshift the depersonalisation which in my experience is not amenable to psychodynamic interpretation though a conflict or conflicts can be identified with the patient.

I am interested to hear your views,

Yours sincerely,

Antoinette Geoghegan
... More

Conflict of interest: None Declared

Write a reply

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *