Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Service user organisations: an untapped teaching resource

  • Ben J. diMambro (a1) and Gillian A. Doody (a2)
Abstract
Aims and Method

To evaluate the introduction of service user-led teaching on experiences of psychiatric services and interview style into the educational programme of trainee psychiatrists. A ten-session programme was devised and delivered in conjunction with a local service user organisation. Twelve trainees underwent the training programme. Evaluation was undertaken through analysis of the feedback forms completed by the trainees.

Results

No significant difference was found between service user-led and psychiatrist-led sessions in content, relevance or presentation.

Clinical Implications

The study demonstrated that service user-led teaching can be integrated into a trainee's education programme without reducing the perceived quality or relevance of their education.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Service user organisations: an untapped teaching resource
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Service user organisations: an untapped teaching resource
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Service user organisations: an untapped teaching resource
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
Babu, K. S., Law-Min, R., Adlam, T., et al (2008) Involving service users and carers in psychiatric education: what do trainees think? Psychiatric Bulletin, 32, 2831.
Butterworth, M. & Livingston, G. (1999) Medical student education. the role of caregivers and families. Psychiatric Bulletin, 23, 549550.
Department of Health (1999) The National Service Framework for Mental Health. Department of Health.
Department of Health (2001) Involving Patients and the Public in Healthcare: A Discussion Document. Department of Health.
Haeney, O., Moholkar, R., Taylor, N., et al (2007) Service user involvement in psychiatric training: a practical perspective. Psychiatric Bulletin, 31, 312314.
Ikkos, G. (2003) Engaging patients as teachers of clinical interview skills. Psychiatric Bulletin, 27, 312315.
Royal College of Psychiatrists (2007) A Competency Based Curriculum for Specialist Training in Psychiatry: Core and General Module. Royal College of Psychiatrists (http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/docs/Curriculum%20-%20core%20and%20general%20module-%20June%202007.doc).
Spencer, J., Blackmore, D., Heard, S., et al (2000) Patient-orientated learning: a review of the role of the patient in the education of medical students. Medical Education, 34, 851857.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 3 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 13 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 22nd July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Service user organisations: an untapped teaching resource

  • Ben J. diMambro (a1) and Gillian A. Doody (a2)
Submit a response

eLetters

Service user lead teaching

Anke Conway Morris, SpR in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
10 February 2009

Dimambro and Doody (2009) describe an evaluation of their innovative teaching programme for trainee psychiatrists delivered by service users. They demonstrate that such a teaching programme is perceived by trainees to be of high quality and relevance to their training. However no comment is made about how the service users perceive the teaching sessions.

We carried out a qualitative evaluation of a service user led teaching session to a group of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Specialist registrars (presented as a poster at the Annual Meeting of the CAP sectionin Liverpool in September 2009). The positive and negative points about the session were recorded by the trainees and the young service users respectively and subsequently analysed. The feedback from both groups was positive overall and both groups reported that it was a useful and enjoyable learning experience. However, one interpretation of our feedbackdata was that trainees employed a number of distancing techniques, such assaying that such training events were more appropriate for more junior trainees, or asking questions about the mental state of the presenters. We hypothesised that by wanting to establish informal relationships duringthe teaching session, the service users unwittingly created difficulties for the SpRs, who preferred to manage relationships with users in a more formal way. The distancing techniques employed in the feedback session with trainees were a way for trainees to establish a more formal distance between service user and doctor.

We concluded that teaching of trainees by service users can be usefuland enjoyable for both, but that care needs to be taken so that potentially valuable lessons are not diluted by placing trainees in situations of role conflict.

References:Dimambro,B.J.& G.A.Doody (2009) Service user organisations: an untapped teaching resource. Psychiatric Bulletin, 33, 72-74.
... More

Conflict of interest: None Declared

Write a reply

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *